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New markets and technological change for the traditional cereals in semiarid sub-Saharan Africa: the Malian case

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  • Jeffrey D. Vitale
  • John H. Sanders

Abstract

During the last three decades in sub-Saharan Africa, development and research resources have concentrated on the higher-rainfall and irrigated regions, especially on export crops and the principal food crops grown there. There has been much less concern and investment in semiarid regions without irrigation. Another negative factor has been the lack of public policy concern with the profitability of the basic food crops. With good weather, prices collapse. With bad weather, governments and NGOs dispense food crops as food aid or at subsidized prices. This article documents the importance of the demand side to facilitate diffusion of new technologies for the basic food commodities of semiarid regions-the traditional cereals. With farm programming models aggregated into a sector model, the combination of technological change and demand shifts for sorghum are evaluated in one semiarid region where the traditional cereals are concentrated. It focuses on combining policies to increase the prices farmers receive after introduction of technologies that use higher input levels. It also compares benefits of a strategy that focuses on yield and demand increases for a traditional cereal of the semiarid region, sorghum, with two alternative strategies for the higher-rainfall zone. Copyright 2005 International Association of Agricultural Economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey D. Vitale & John H. Sanders, 2005. "New markets and technological change for the traditional cereals in semiarid sub-Saharan Africa: the Malian case," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(2), pages 111-129, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:32:y:2005:i:2:p:111-129
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Abdoulaye, Tahirou & Sanders, John H., 2006. "New technologies, marketing strategies and public policy for traditional food crops: Millet in Niger," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 90(1-3), pages 272-292, October.
    2. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O., 2015. "Fertilizer subsidies, political influence and local food prices in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Nigeria," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 11-24.
    3. Kelly, Valerie & Diakité, Lamissa & Teme, Bino, 2015. "Sorghum Productivity in Mali: Past, Present, and Future," Food Security International Development Working Papers 207024, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Jeanne Y. Coulibaly & John H. Sanders & Paul V. Preckel & Timothy G. Baker, 2015. "Will cotton make a comeback in Mali?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(1), pages 53-67, January.
    5. Nin-Pratt, Alejandro & Johnson, Michael & Magalhaes, Eduardo & You, Liangzhi & Diao, Xinshen & Chamberlin, Jordan, 2011. "Yield gaps and potential agricultural growth in West and Central Africa:," Research reports alejandronin-pratt, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Isabel Günther & Mohamed Ali Marouani & Marc Raffinot, 2006. "La croissance est-elle pro-pauvres au Mali ?," Working Papers DT/2006/15, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    7. Tahirou Abdoulaye & John Sanders, 2005. "New Technologies, Marketing Strategies and Public Policy for Traditional Food Crops: Millet in Niger," Working Papers 05-07, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    8. repec:dau:papers:123456789/1241 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Aune, Jens B. & Bationo, André, 2008. "Agricultural intensification in the Sahel - The ladder approach," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 119-125, September.
    10. Yigezu A. Yigezu & John H. Sanders, 2008. "Introducing New Technologies And Marketing Strategies For Households With Malnutrition: An Ethiopian Case Study," Working Papers 08-05, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    11. Baquedano, Felix G. & Sanders, John H. & Vitale, Jeffrey, 2010. "Increasing incomes of Malian cotton farmers: Is elimination of US subsidies the only solution?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 103(7), pages 418-432, September.
    12. Vitale, Jeffrey D. & Sanders, John H., 2005. "Estimating the Impacts of Liberalization in West Africa: The Malian Case," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19481, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    13. Burney, Jennifer A. & Naylor, Rosamond L., 2012. "Smallholder Irrigation as a Poverty Alleviation Tool in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 110-123.
    14. Generoso, Rémi, 2015. "How do rainfall variability, food security and remittances interact? The case of rural Mali," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 188-198.
    15. Uaiene, Rafael N., 2006. "Introduction of New Agricultural Technologies and Marketing Strategies in Central Mozambique," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55861, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    16. Kizito, Andrew M., 2009. "Estimating the Benefits from Improved Market Information," Graduate Research Masters Degree Plan B Papers 48844, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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