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Overcoming the Lost Decades? Abenomics after Three Years

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  • Joshua K. Hausman

    (University of Michigan)

  • Johannes F. Wieland

    (University of California, San Diego)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Joshua K. Hausman & Johannes F. Wieland, 2015. "Overcoming the Lost Decades? Abenomics after Three Years," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(2 (Fall)), pages 385-431.
  • Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:46:y:2015:i:2015-02:p:385-431
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Christina D., 1992. "What Ended the Great Depression?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(4), pages 757-784, December.
    2. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2002. "Sticky Information versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1295-1328.
    3. Blanchard, Olivier J. & Romer, David & Spence, Michael & Stiglitz, Joseph E. (ed.), 2012. "In the Wake of the Crisis: Leading Economists Reassess Economic Policy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026201761x.
    4. Saten Kumar & Hassan Afrouzi & Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2015. "Inflation Targeting Does Not Anchor Inflation Expectations: Evidence from Firms in New Zealand," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(2 (Fall)), pages 151-225.
    5. Jamal Ibrahim Haidar & Takeo Hoshi, "undated". "Implementing Structural Reforms in Abenomics: How to Reduce the Cost of Doing Business in Japan," Working Paper 316046, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    6. James Cloyne & Clodomiro Ferreira & Paolo Surico, 2020. "Monetary Policy when Households have Debt: New Evidence on the Transmission Mechanism," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(1), pages 102-129.
    7. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2015. "Information Rigidity and the Expectations Formation Process: A Simple Framework and New Facts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(8), pages 2644-2678, August.
    8. Rose, Jonathan D., 2010. "Hoover's Truce: Wage Rigidity in the Onset of the Great Depression," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 70(4), pages 843-870, December.
    9. Gauti B. Eggertsson, 2012. "Was the New Deal Contractionary?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 524-555, February.
    10. Joshua K. Hausman & Johannes F. Wieland, 2014. "Abenomics: Preliminary Analysis and Outlook," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 45(1 (Spring), pages 1-76.
    11. Iván Werning, 2015. "Incomplete Markets and Aggregate Demand," NBER Working Papers 21448, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Jérémie Cohen‐Setton & Joshua K. Hausman & Johannes F. Wieland, 2017. "Supply‐Side Policies in the Depression: Evidence from France," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 49(2-3), pages 273-317, March.
    13. Lars E.O. Svensson, 2003. "Escaping from a Liquidity Trap and Deflation: The Foolproof Way and Others," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 145-166, Fall.
    14. Adam S. Posen, 1998. "Restoring Japan's Economic Growth," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 35, July.
    15. Takatoshi Ito, 2014. "We Are All QE-sians Now," IMES Discussion Paper Series 14-E-07, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    16. Gauti B. Eggertsson & Paul Krugman, 2012. "Debt, Deleveraging, and the Liquidity Trap: A Fisher-Minsky-Koo Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1469-1513.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ryuzo Miyao & Tatsuyoshi Okimoto, 2020. "Regime shifts in the effects of Japan’s unconventional monetary policies," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 88(6), pages 749-772, December.
    2. Venturini, Fiorenza, 2016. "Are Estimates of Fiscal Multipliers Truly Reliable? Some Observations Starting from the Case of Japan," Centro Sraffa Working Papers CSWP23, Centro di Ricerche e Documentazione "Piero Sraffa".
    3. Michelis, Andrea De & Iacoviello, Matteo, 2016. "Raising an inflation target: The Japanese experience with Abenomics," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 67-87.
    4. Takuji Kawamoto & Moe Nakahama, 2017. "Why Did the BOJ Not Achieve the 2 Percent Inflation Target with a Time Horizon of About Two Years? -- Examination by Time Series Analysis --," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 17-E-10, Bank of Japan.
    5. Michau, Jean-Baptiste, 2019. "Monetary and fiscal policy in a liquidity trap with inflation persistence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 1-28.
    6. Fructuoso Borrallo Egea & Pedro del Río López, 2021. "Estrategia de política monetaria e inflación en Japón," Occasional Papers 2116, Banco de España.
    7. Markus Heckel & Kiyohiko G. Nishimura, 2020. "Unconventional Monetary Policy through Open Market Operations: A Principal Component Analysis," CARF F-Series CARF-F-501, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
    8. Baines, Joseph & Hager, Sandy Brian, 2019. "Financial Crisis, Inequality, and Capitalist Diversity: A Critique of the Capital as Power Model of the Stock Market," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    9. Bank for International Settlements, 2019. "Unconventional monetary policy tools: a cross-country analysis," CGFS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 63, June.
    10. Yixiao Jiang & George K. Zestos & Zachary Timmerman, 2020. "A Vector Error Correction Model for Japanese Real Exports," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 48(3), pages 297-311, September.
    11. Fructuoso Borrallo Egea & Pedro del Río López, 2021. "Monetary policy strategy and inflation in Japan," Occasional Papers 2116, Banco de España.

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