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Gender Inequality In The Labour Market In Serbia


  • Olgica Bošković
  • Nikola Njegovan


Many positive changes have been implemented in Serbia since the beginning of the transition period, and while these improve the position of women in the labour market the main indicators still show significant gender differences. Women are the majority of the unemployed and there are significant differences betweenregions and districts, in fields of work, experience, and the length of time taken to find work. An analysis of trends in the labour market over the past decade shows a worsening of the position of women, with a lower participation in economic activity and employment, rising unemployment rates, and an increase in the average time to find work and the proportion of women in traditionally female occupations.Problemsof genderinequalitydemandmore attentionin order to improve existing legislation and the implementation of economic policies in the labour market which will ensure higher participation ofwomen with lower education, with special emphasis on increasing the motivation of these women to undergo continuing education and training.

Suggested Citation

  • Olgica Bošković & Nikola Njegovan, 2012. "Gender Inequality In The Labour Market In Serbia," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 57(192), pages 113-136, January –.
  • Handle: RePEc:beo:journl:v:57:y:2012:i:192:p:113-136

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    activity; employment; unemployment; discrimination; gender equality; gender inequality index;

    JEL classification:

    • J70 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - General
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing


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