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Spillovers

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  • Alston, Julian M.

Abstract

Interstate and international spillovers from public agricultural research and development (R&D) investments account for a significant share of agricultural productivitygrowth. Hence, spillovers of agricultural R&D results across geopolitical boundaries have implications for measures of research impacts on productivity, and the implied rates of return to research, as well as for state, national and international agricultural research policy. In studies of aggregate state or national agricultural productivity, interstate or international R&D spillovers might account for half or more of the total measured productivitygrowth. Similarly, results from studies of particular crop technologies indicate that international technology spillovers, and multinational impacts of technologies from international centres, were important elements in the total picture of agricultural development in the 20th Century. Within countries, funding institutions have been developed to address spatial spillovers of agricultural technologies. The fact that corresponding institutions have not been developed for international spillovers has contributed to a global underinvestment in certain types of agricultural research.

Suggested Citation

  • Alston, Julian M., 2002. "Spillovers," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 46(3), September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:118618
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/118618
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Guettler, Stefan & Seidel-Lass, Linda & Mueller, Rolf A.E., 2011. "Simulating the Spillover Benefits from R&D by a small producer country embedded in a Network: Aquaculture R&D in Germany," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114589, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Tokgoz, Simla, 2003. "R&D Spillovers In Agriculture: Results From A North-South Trade Model," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22258, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Waleerat Suphannachart & Peter Warr, 2010. "Total Factor Productivity in Thai Agriculture Measurement and Determinants," Working Papers 201001, Kasetsart University, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    4. Pardey, Philip G. & Koo, Bonwoo & Nottenburg, Carol, 2004. "Creating, Protecting, And Using Crop Biotechnologies Worldwide In An Era Of Intellectual Property," Staff Papers 13600, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    5. Magalhaes, Eduardo & Diao, Xinshen, 2009. "Productivity convergence in Brazil: The case of grain production," IFPRI discussion papers 857, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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