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How Do Shocks to Non-Cognitive Skills Affect Test Scores?

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  • Stefanie Behncke

Abstract

This paper investigates the extent to which test performance is affected by shocks to non-cognitive skills. In a field experiment, students took a mathematics test. Students were clustered into several student groups that were randomly assigned to treatment and control group. The treatment consisted of positive affirmation before students began taking the test. This affirmation significantly raised students' test scores. In particular, students with low maths grades and with self-assessed difficulties in maths achieved higher test scores. Results suggest that teachers may raise their students' performance by interventions to their non-cognitive skills.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefanie Behncke, 2012. "How Do Shocks to Non-Cognitive Skills Affect Test Scores?," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 107-108, pages 155-173.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2012:i:107-108:p:155-173
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    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23646575
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    Cited by:

    1. Marta De Philippis & Federico Rossi, 2016. "Parents, schools and human capital differences across countries," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1079, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Elizabeth W. Cavadel & Jacqueline F. Kauff & Mary Anne Anderson & Sheena McConnell & Michelle Derr, "undated". "Self-Regulation and Goal Attainment: A New Perspective for Employment Programs," Mathematica Policy Research Reports e49aff23628f45bd847fd2e86, Mathematica Policy Research.
    3. De Philippis, Marta & Rossi, Frederico, 2016. "Parents, schools and human capital differences across countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86233, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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