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How Do Shocks to Non-Cognitive Skills Affect Test Scores?

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  • Stefanie Behncke

Abstract

This paper investigates the extent to which test performance is affected by shocks to non-cognitive skills. In a field experiment, students took a mathematics test. Students were clustered into several student groups that were randomly assigned to treatment and control group. The treatment consisted of positive affirmation before students began taking the test. This affirmation significantly raised students' test scores. In particular, students with low maths grades and with self-assessed difficulties in maths achieved higher test scores. Results suggest that teachers may raise their students' performance by interventions to their non-cognitive skills.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefanie Behncke, 2012. "How Do Shocks to Non-Cognitive Skills Affect Test Scores?," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 107-108, pages 155-173.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2012:i:107-108:p:155-173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lex Borghans & Huub Meijers & Bas Ter Weel, 2008. "The Role Of Noncognitive Skills In Explaining Cognitive Test Scores," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 46(1), pages 2-12, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marta De Philippis & Federico Rossi, 2016. "Parents, schools and human capital differences across countries," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1079, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Martin Schlotter, 2012. "Educational Production in Preschools and Schools - Microeconometric Evidence from Germany," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 41, March.
    3. Almlund, Mathilde & Duckworth, Angela Lee & Heckman, James & Kautz, Tim, 2011. "Personality Psychology and Economics," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    4. Stéphane Carcillo & Rodrigo Fernandez & Sebastian Königs & Andreea Minea, 2015. "NEET Youth in the Aftermath of the Crisis," Sciences Po publications 164, Sciences Po.
    5. Martin Schlotter, 2011. "Age at Preschool Entrance and Noncognitive Skills before School - An Instrumental Variable Approach," ifo Working Paper Series 112, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    6. Elizabeth W. Cavadel & Jacqueline F. Kauff & Mary Anne Anderson & Sheena McConnell & Michelle Derr, "undated". "Self-Regulation and Goal Attainment: A New Perspective for Employment Programs," Mathematica Policy Research Reports e49aff23628f45bd847fd2e86, Mathematica Policy Research.
    7. De Philippis, Marta & Rossi, Frederico, 2016. "Parents, schools and human capital differences across countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86233, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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