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Voluntary Provision of Public Goods: Experimental Results with Interior Nash Equilibria

Citations

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Cited by:

  1. Hoyer, Maximilian & Bault, Nadège & Loerakker, Ben & van Winden, Frans, 2014. "Destructive behavior in a Fragile Public Good game," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(3), pages 295-299.
  2. Anna Gunnthorsdottir & Amnon Rapoport, 2003. "The effect of sharing rules on group competition," Experimental 0307003, EconWPA.
  3. Cardenas, Juan-Camilo & Ostrom, Elinor, 2004. "What do people bring into the game? Experiments in the field about cooperation in the commons," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 82(3), pages 307-326, December.
  4. Cason, Timothy N. & Saijo, Tatsuyoshi & Yamato, Takehiko & Yokotani, Konomu, 2004. "Non-excludable public good experiments," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 81-102, October.
  5. Simon Gaechter & Daniele Nosenzo & Elke Renner & Martin Sefton, 2009. "Sequential versus Simultaneous Contributions to Public Goods: Experimental Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 2602, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Philipp E. Otto & Friedel Bolle, 2016. "Organizational power: Should remuneration heterogeneity mirror hierarchy?," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 20(3), pages 187-205, September.
  7. R. Isaac & James Walker, 1998. "Nash as an Organizing Principle in the Voluntary Provision of Public Goods: Experimental Evidence," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 1(3), pages 191-206, December.
  8. Thoron, Sylvie & Sol, Emmanuel & Willinger, Marc, 2009. "Do binding agreements solve the social dilemma?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(11-12), pages 1271-1282, December.
  9. Marco Casari, 2004. "Can Genetic Algorithms Explain Experimental Anomalies?," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 24(3), pages 257-275, March.
  10. Kingsley, David C., 2016. "Endowment heterogeneity and peer punishment in a public good experiment: Cooperation and normative conflict," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 49-61.
  11. Marco Faravelli & Oliver Kirchkamp & Helmut Rainer, 2010. "Social Welfare versus Inequality Concerns in an Incomplete Contract Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 2933, CESifo Group Munich.
  12. Gill, David & Stone, Rebecca, 2015. "Desert and inequity aversion in teams," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 42-54.
  13. Jonathan Maurice & Agathe Rouaix & Marc Willinger, 2013. "Income Redistribution And Public Good Provision: An Experiment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54, pages 957-975, August.
  14. Lisa R. Anderson & Jennifer M. Mellor & Jeffrey Milyo, 2003. "Inequality, Group Cohesion, and Public Good Provision: An Experimental Analysis," Working Papers 0308, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
  15. Kimbrough, Erik O. & Sheremeta, Roman M. & Shields, Timothy W., 2014. "When parity promotes peace: Resolving conflict between asymmetric agents," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 96-108.
  16. Silverman, Dan & Slemrod, Joel & Uler, Neslihan, 2014. "Distinguishing the role of authority “in” and authority “to”," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 32-42.
  17. repec:eee:jeborg:v:141:y:2017:i:c:p:233-253 is not listed on IDEAS
  18. Marc Willinger & Anthony Ziegelmeyer, 2001. "Strength of the Social Dilemma in a Public Goods Experiment: An Exploration of the Error Hypothesis," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 4(2), pages 131-144, October.
  19. John Spraggon, 2003. "Exogenous Targeting Instruments with Heterogeneous Agents," McMaster Experimental Economics Laboratory Publications 2003-02, McMaster University.
  20. Kurtis Swope, 2002. "An Experimental Investigation of Excludable Public Goods," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 5(3), pages 209-222, December.
  21. Charles Figuières & David Masclet & Marc Willinger, 2013. "Weak Moral Motivation Leads to the Decline of Voluntary Contributions," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 15(5), pages 745-772, October.
  22. Tatsuyoshi Saijo & Takehiko Yamato & Konomu Yokotani, 2003. "Non-Excludable Public Good Experiments revised October 2003, forthcoming in Games and Economic Behavior," Discussion papers 03011, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  23. Jacob K. Goeree & Charles A. Holt & Susan K. Laury, 1999. "Altruism and Noisy Behavior in One-Shot Public Goods Experiments," Virginia Economics Online Papers 331, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
  24. Kameda, Tatsuya & Tsukasaki, Takafumi & Hastie, Reid & Berg, Nathan, 2010. "Democracy under uncertainty: The ‘wisdom of crowds’ and the free-rider problem in group decision making," MPRA Paper 26584, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  25. Bracha, Anat & Menietti, Michael & Vesterlund, Lise, 2011. "Seeds to succeed?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(5), pages 416-427.
  26. Werner Güth & Lauri Sääksvuori, 2010. "The Provision of Public Goods with Positive Group Interdependencies," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-022, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  27. Kingsley, David C. & Liu, Benyuan, 2014. "Cooperation across payoff equivalent public good and common pool resource experiments," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 79-84.
  28. repec:eee:joepsy:v:63:y:2017:i:c:p:199-215 is not listed on IDEAS
  29. repec:eee:soceco:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:130-139 is not listed on IDEAS
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