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Cross-border tax evasion after the common reporting standard: Game over?

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Listed:
  • Casi, Elisa
  • Spengel, Christoph
  • Stage, Barbara M. B.

Abstract

We study the effect of the first global multilateral standard for the automatic exchange of information (AEOI), the so called Common Reporting Standard (CRS), on cross border tax evasion. Employing newly available bilateral data on cross-border deposits, we find that the CRS induced a reduction of 11.9% in cross-border deposits parked in traditional offshore countries for tax evasion purposes. Moreover, regardless of the 2,600 bilateral exchange relations created under the CRS, relocation is still a desirable option. More specifically, upon the CRS implementation at the domestic level, the United States, which so far did not commit to the CRS, seems to emerge as a potentially attractive location for cross-border tax evasion.

Suggested Citation

  • Casi, Elisa & Spengel, Christoph & Stage, Barbara M. B., 2019. "Cross-border tax evasion after the common reporting standard: Game over?," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-036, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:18036
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    Cited by:

    1. Ludger Schuknecht & Vincent Siegerink, 2021. "The Political Economy of the International Tax Transparency Agenda in the G20/OECD Context," CESifo Working Paper Series 8813, CESifo.
    2. Lisa De Simone & Rebecca Lester & Kevin Markle, 2020. "Transparency and Tax Evasion: Evidence from the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA)," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(1), pages 105-153, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tax Evasion; Automatic Exchange of Information; Offshore Countries; Cross-Border Deposits;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household

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