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A call to action: From evolution to revolution on the common reporting standard

Author

Listed:
  • Casi, Elisa
  • Nenadic, Sara
  • Orlic, Mark Dinko
  • Spengel, Christoph

Abstract

As a result of technical development and globalization, investing abroad has become much more accessible, and thus, an important channel for transferring wealth and income to offshore locations with the aim to avoid tax obligations at home. In this regard, the automatic exchange of information (AEOI) across countries is a strong weapon to stop cross-border tax evasion. This is why, in 2014, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) launched its proposal for a global AEOI standard, the so-called Common Reporting Standard (CRS). This article provides a cross-country analysis of the national CRS laws for a sample of 41 countries with the aim to determine whether significant deviations from the original OECD model may hinder the effectiveness of the AEOI. Our key recommendation to the OECD and all participating jurisdictions is to achieve a higher level of standardization when designing CRS locally. Furthermore, international pressure on the U.S. to join the CRS is needed. A global AEOI system having the potential to put an end to cross-border tax evasion can be achieved only with the elimination of all attractive locations for illicit financial flows.

Suggested Citation

  • Casi, Elisa & Nenadic, Sara & Orlic, Mark Dinko & Spengel, Christoph, 2018. "A call to action: From evolution to revolution on the common reporting standard," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-035, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:18035
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Katarzyna Bilicka & Clemens Fuest, 2014. "With which countries do tax havens share information?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 21(2), pages 175-197, April.
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    3. Michelle Hanlon & Edward L. Maydew & Jacob R. Thornock, 2015. "Taking the Long Way Home: U.S. Tax Evasion and Offshore Investments in U.S. Equity and Debt Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 70(1), pages 257-287, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Casi, Elisa & Spengel, Christoph & Stage, Barbara M. B., 2019. "Cross-border tax evasion after the common reporting standard: Game over?," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-036, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Automatic Exchange of Information; Tax Evasion; Offshore Locations; Common Reporting Standard;

    JEL classification:

    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household

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