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A call to action: From evolution to revolution on the Common Reporting Standard

Author

Listed:
  • Casi, Elisa
  • Nenadic, Sara
  • Orlic, Mark Dinko
  • Spengel, Christoph

Abstract

As a result of technical development and globalisation, investing abroad has become much more accessible, and thus capable of facilitating the transference of wealth and income to offshore locations with the aim of evading tax obligations at home. In this regard, the Automatic Exchange of Information (AEOI) across countries is an important weapon in the fight to undermine cross-border tax evasion. This is why, in 2014, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) launched its proposal for a global AEOI standard, the so-called Common Reporting Standard (CRS). This article provides a cross-country analysis of the national CRS laws for a sample of 41 countries with the aim of determining whether significant deviations from the original OECD Model might hinder the effectiveness of the AEOI. The authors' key recommendation to the OECD and all participating jurisdictions is to achieve a higher level of standardisation when designing the CRS locally. Furthermore, international pressure on the US to join the CRS is needed. A global AEOI system can contribute substantially to the fight against cross-border tax evasion only if all attractive locations for illicit financial flows are eliminated.

Suggested Citation

  • Casi, Elisa & Nenadic, Sara & Orlic, Mark Dinko & Spengel, Christoph, 2019. "A call to action: From evolution to revolution on the Common Reporting Standard," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-035, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research, revised 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:18035
    Note: This material was first published by Thomson Reuters, trading as Sweet & Maxwell, 5 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AQ, in the British Tax Review as Casi, Nenadic, Orlic, Spengel "A call to action: from evolution to revolution on the common reporting standard" [2019] (2) BTR 166-204 and is reproduced by agreement with the publishers.
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    Cited by:

    1. Casi, Elisa & Spengel, Christoph & Stage, Barbara M.B., 2020. "Cross-border tax evasion after the common reporting standard: Game over?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 190(C).
    2. Alstadsæter, Annette & Casi, Elisa & Miethe, Jakob & Stage, Barbara M. B., 2023. "Lost in Information: National Implementation of Global Tax Agreements," Discussion Papers 2023/22, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Business and Management Science, revised 20 Feb 2024.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Automatic Exchange of Information; Tax Evasion; Offshore Locations; Common Reporting Standard;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household

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