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Towards a consumer sentiment channel of monetary policy

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  • Debes, Sebastian
  • Gareis, Johannes
  • Mayer, Eric
  • Rüth, Sebastian

Abstract

We investigate the role of consumer confidence in the transmission of monetary policy shocks from an empirical and theoretical perspective. Standard VAR based analysis suggests that an empirical measure of consumer confidence drops significantly after a monetary tightening and amplifies the impact of monetary policy on aggregate consumption. Using a behavioral DSGE model, we show that a consumer sentiment channel can account for the empirical findings. In an environment of heterogeneous expectations, which gives rise to the notion of consumer sentiment, innovations to the Federal Funds rate impact on consumer confidence and thereby the broader economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Debes, Sebastian & Gareis, Johannes & Mayer, Eric & Rüth, Sebastian, 2014. "Towards a consumer sentiment channel of monetary policy," W.E.P. - Würzburg Economic Papers 91, University of Würzburg, Chair for Monetary Policy and International Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:wuewep:91
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    Cited by:

    1. Valeriu Nalban, 2016. "Sentiment-Driven Asymmetries in Romanian Monetary Policy Transmission," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(3), pages 251-270, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy; monetary transmission; consumer sentiment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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