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Does New Health Information Affect Health Behavior? The Effect of Health Events on Smoking Cessation

Listed author(s):
  • Bünnings, Christian

This paper investigates whether new health information affects smoking behavior. Interpreting three distinct categories of health events as different information, the paper also tests whether behavioral change depends on the type of information received. Based on retrospectively reported data on smoking behavior from the Swiss Household Panel, a linear probability model is applied to estimate the effects of three different health events on the decision to quit smoking. The empirical results yield robust evidence that smokers respond differently to health events that are due to different causes. Suffering from physical health problems increases the inclination to stop smoking, the opposite holds true for mental disorders, while accidents do not affect health behavior at all. Analyses of effect heterogeneity further reveal that the same type of information affects various subgroups of the population differently.

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File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/88757/1/774661151.pdf
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Paper provided by RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen in its series Ruhr Economic Papers with number 459.

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Date of creation: 2013
Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:459
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  2. Christopoulou, Rebekka & Lillard, Dean R., 2015. "Is smoking behavior culturally determined? Evidence from British immigrants," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 78-90.
  3. Hong Liu & Wei Tan, 2009. "The Effect of Anti-Smoking Media Campaign on Smoking Behavior: The California Experience," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 10(1), pages 29-47, May.
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  6. Ida, Takanori & Goto, Rei & Takahashi, Yuko & Nishimura, Shuzo, 2011. "Can economic-psychological parameters predict successful smoking cessation?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 285-295, May.
  7. V. Kerry Smith & Donald H. Taylor & Frank A. Sloan & F. Reed Johnson & William H. Desvousges, 2001. "Do Smokers Respond To Health Shocks?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(4), pages 675-687, November.
  8. Jan Marcus, 2014. "Does Job Loss Make You Smoke and Gain Weight?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 81(324), pages 626-648, October.
  9. Regina T. Riphahn, 1999. "Income and employment effects of health shocks A test case for the German welfare state," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(3), pages 363-389.
  10. Martin Forster & Andrew M. Jones, 2001. "The role of tobacco taxes in starting and quitting smoking: Duration analysis of British data," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 164(3), pages 517-547.
  11. Suranovic, Steven M. & Goldfarb, Robert S. & Leonard, Thomas C., 1999. "An economic theory of cigarette addiction," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-29, January.
  12. Leonie Sundmacher, 2012. "The effect of health shocks on smoking and obesity," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(4), pages 451-460, August.
  13. Douglas, Stratford, 1998. "The Duration of the Smoking Habit," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(1), pages 49-64, January.
  14. Donald S. Kenkel & Dean R. Lillard & Alan D. Mathios, 2004. "Accounting for misclassification error in retrospective smoking data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 1031-1044.
  15. Douglas, Stratford & Hariharan, Govind, 1994. "The hazard of starting smoking: Estimates from a split population duration model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 213-230, July.
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