IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/hlthec/v13y2004i10p1031-1044.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Accounting for misclassification error in retrospective smoking data

Author

Listed:
  • Donald S. Kenkel

    (Department of Policy Analysis and Management, Cornell University, USA)

  • Dean R. Lillard

    (Department of Policy Analysis and Management, Cornell University, USA)

  • Alan D. Mathios

    (Department of Policy Analysis and Management, Cornell University, USA)

Abstract

Recent waves of major longitudinal surveys in the US and other countries include retrospective questions about the timing of smoking initiation and cessation, creating a potentially important but under-utilized source of information on smoking behavior over the life course. In this paper, we explore the extent of, consequences of, and possible solutions to misclassification errors in models of smoking participation that use data generated from retrospective reports. In our empirical work, we exploit the fact that the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 provides both contemporaneous and retrospective information about smoking status in certain years. We compare the results from four sets of models of smoking participation. The first set of results are from baseline probit models of smoking participation from contemporaneously reported information. The second set of results are from models that are identical except that the dependent variable is based on retrospective information. The last two sets of results are from models that take a parametric approach to account for a simple form of misclassification error. Our preliminary results suggest that accounting for misclassification error is important. However, the adjusted maximum likelihood estimation approach to account for misclassification does not always perform as expected. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Donald S. Kenkel & Dean R. Lillard & Alan D. Mathios, 2004. "Accounting for misclassification error in retrospective smoking data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 1031-1044.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:13:y:2004:i:10:p:1031-1044
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.934
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.934
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Philip DeCicca & Donald Kenkel & Alan Mathios & Yoon-Jeong Shin & Jae-Young Lim, 2008. "Youth smoking, cigarette prices, and anti-smoking sentiment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(6), pages 733-749.
    2. Chaloupka, Frank J. & Warner, Kenneth E., 2000. "The economics of smoking," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 29, pages 1539-1627, Elsevier.
    3. Martin Forster & Andrew M. Jones, 2001. "The role of tobacco taxes in starting and quitting smoking: Duration analysis of British data," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 164(3), pages 517-547.
    4. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1994:84:7:1086-1093_9 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Becker, Gary S & Grossman, Michael & Murphy, Kevin M, 1994. "An Empirical Analysis of Cigarette Addiction," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 396-418, June.
    6. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1989:79:8:1020-1023_0 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Picone Gabriel & Sloan Frank, 2003. "Smoking Cessation and Lifestyle Changes," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-30, January.
    8. Matthew C. Farrelly & William N. Evans & Edward Montgomery, 1999. "Do Workplace Smoking Bans Reduce Smoking?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 728-747, September.
    9. Hausman, J. A. & Abrevaya, Jason & Scott-Morton, F. M., 1998. "Misclassification of the dependent variable in a discrete-response setting," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 239-269, September.
    10. Lewbel, Arthur, 2000. "Identification Of The Binary Choice Model With Misclassification," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 603-609, August.
    11. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1989:79:2:200-202_9 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Philip DeCicca & Donald Kenkel & Alan Mathios, 2002. "Putting Out the Fires: Will Higher Taxes Reduce the Onset of Youth Smoking?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(1), pages 144-169, February.
    13. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2002:92:8:1346-1351_5 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Douglas, Stratford, 1998. "The Duration of the Smoking Habit," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(1), pages 49-64, January.
    15. Wasserman, Jeffrey & Manning, Willard G. & Newhouse, Joseph P. & Winkler, John D., 1991. "The effects of excise taxes and regulations on cigarette smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 43-64, May.
    16. Poterba, James M & Summers, Lawrence H, 1995. "Unemployment Benefits and Labor Market Transitions: A Multinomial Logit Model with Errors in Classification," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 207-216, May.
    17. Douglas, Stratford & Hariharan, Govind, 1994. "The hazard of starting smoking: Estimates from a split population duration model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 213-230, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rochelle Belkar & Waranya Pim Chanthapun & Denzil G. Fiebig, 2007. "A discrete choice model with misclassification and multiple recall periods," Discussion Papers 2007-10, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    2. Adele Bergin, 2015. "Employer Changes and Wage Changes: Estimation with Measurement Error in a Binary Variable," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(2), pages 194-223, June.
    3. van Ours, Jan C. & Williams, Jenny, 2009. "Why parents worry: Initiation into cannabis use by youth and their educational attainment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 132-142, January.
    4. Quirmbach, Diana & Gerry, Christopher J., 2016. "Gender, education and Russia’s tobacco epidemic: A life-course approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 54-66.
    5. Dammert, Ana C. & Galdo, Jose, 2013. "Child Labor Variation by Type of Respondent: Evidence from a Large-Scale Study," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 207-220.
    6. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:10:p:987-1000 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Arrieta, Alejandro, 2007. "A Structural Misclassifcation Model to Estimate the Impact of Physician Incentives on Healthcare Utilization," MPRA Paper 6718, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Auld M. Christopher & Zarrabi Mahmood, 2015. "Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Prices Faced by Adolescents," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(1), pages 1-24, January.
    9. Christian Bünnings, 2013. "Does New Health Information Affect Health Behavior? The Effect of Health Events on Smoking Cessation," Ruhr Economic Papers 0459, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    10. Philip DeCicca & Donald Kenkel & Alan Mathios & Yoon-Jeong Shin & Jae-Young Lim, 2008. "Youth smoking, cigarette prices, and anti-smoking sentiment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(6), pages 733-749.
    11. Christian Bünnings, 2017. "Does new health information affect health behaviour? The effect of health events on smoking cessation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(10), pages 987-1000, February.
    12. Damien Bricard & Stéphane Legleye & Myriam Khlat, 2018. "Changes in smoking behaviour over family transitions: evidence for anticipation and adaptation effects," Working Papers hal-01831985, HAL.
    13. Grignon, Michel, 2009. "An empirical investigation of heterogeneity in time preferences and smoking behaviors," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 739-751, October.
    14. Dye, Richard F. & McMillen, Daniel P., 2007. "Teardowns and land values in the Chicago metropolitan area," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 45-63, January.
    15. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:56:y:2018:i:1:p:424-445 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Adele Bergin, 2013. "Job Changes and Wage Changes: Estimation with Measurement Error in a Binary Variable," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n240-13.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    17. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot & François Beck & Myriam Khlat & Stéphane Legleye, 2016. "Educational inequalities in smoking over the life cycle: an analysis by cohort and gender," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(1), pages 101-109, January.
    18. Daniel Eisenberg & Brian Rowe, 2008. "The Effects of Smoking in Young Adulthood on Smoking and Health Later in Life: Evidence Based on the Vietnam Era Draft Lottery," Working Papers 08-35, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    19. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot, 2012. "Milieu d’origine, situation sociale et parcours tabagique en France," Post-Print hal-01593798, HAL.
    20. repec:zbw:rwirep:0459 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Deliana Kostova & Frank Chaloupka & Ce Shang, 2015. "A duration analysis of the role of cigarette prices on smoking initiation and cessation in developing countries," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(3), pages 279-288, April.
    22. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot & François Beck & Myriam Khlat & Stéphane Legleye, 2016. "Educational inequalities in smoking over the life cycle: an analysis by cohort and gender," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(1), pages 101-109, January.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:13:y:2004:i:10:p:1031-1044. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.