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Gender diversity in top-management positions in large family and nonfamily businesses

Listed author(s):
  • Kay, Rosemarie
  • Schlömer-Laufen, Nadine
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    (Why) does the sex ratio in top-management positions in large family and nonfamily businesses differ? Using a unique data set and estimating (fractional) logit regressions we show that the female share in top-management positions in family businesses exceeds the one in nonfamily businesses. One reason is the selection mechanism social homophily from which females in family businesses benefit more because of a higher female share in the decision making body in family businesses. Another reason is the pathway self-appointment as (co-) leader of one's own business which is more common in family businesses. Nepotism seems not to play a role.

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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/144207/1/862637767.pdf
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    Paper provided by Institut für Mittelstandsforschung (IfM) Bonn in its series Working Papers with number 02/16.

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    Date of creation: 2016
    Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifmwps:0216
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    1. Elke Holst & Anja Kirsch, 2014. "Women Still the Exception on Executive Boards of Germany's Large Firms: Gradually Increasing Representation on Supervisory Boards," DIW Economic Bulletin, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 4(3), pages 3-15.
    2. Adams, Renée B. & Ferreira, Daniel, 2009. "Women in the boardroom and their impact on governance and performance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 291-309, November.
    3. Henrekson, Magnus & Stenkula, Mikael, 2009. "Why Are There So Few Female Top Executives in Egalitarian Welfare States?," Working Paper Series 786, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    4. J.H. Marinova & J. Plantenga & C.L.H.S. Remery, 2010. "Gender Diversity and Firm Performance: Evidence from Dutch and Danish Boardrooms," Working Papers 10-03, Utrecht School of Economics.
    5. Haunschild, Ljuba & Wolter, Hans-Jürgen, 2010. "Volkswirtschaftliche Bedeutung von Familien- und Frauenunternehmen," IfM-Materialien 199, Institut für Mittelstandsforschung (IfM) Bonn.
    6. Farrell, Kathleen A. & Hersch, Philip L., 2005. "Additions to corporate boards: the effect of gender," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(1-2), pages 85-106, March.
    7. Welter, Friederike & May-Strobl, Eva & Holz, Michael & Pahnke, André & Schlepphorst, Susanne & Wolter, Hans-Jürgen & Kranzusch, Peter, 2015. "Mittelstand zwischen Fakten und Gefühl," IfM-Materialien 234, Institut für Mittelstandsforschung (IfM) Bonn.
    8. Anders Hoffmann & Martin Junge & Nikolaj Malchow-Møller, 2015. "Running in the family: parental role models in entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 79-104, January.
    9. Laspita, Stavroula & Breugst, Nicola & Heblich, Stephan & Patzelt, Holger, 2012. "Intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurial intentions," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 414-435.
    10. Kurtulus, Fidan Ana & Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald, 2012. "Do Women Top Managers Help Women Advance? A Panel Study Using EEO-1 Records," IZA Discussion Papers 6444, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Helen Kang & Mandy Cheng & Sidney J. Gray, 2007. "Corporate Governance and Board Composition: diversity and independence of Australian boards," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 194-207, 03.
    12. Ahrens, Jan-Philipp & Landmann, Andreas & Woywode, Michael, 2015. "Gender preferences in the CEO successions of family firms: Family characteristics and human capital of the successor," Journal of Family Business Strategy, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 86-103.
    13. Fidan Ana Kurtulus & Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, 2011. "Do Women Top Managers Help Women Advance? A Panel Study Using EEO-1 Records," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-14, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
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