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Who Are Afraid of Losing Their Jobs to Artificial Intelligence and Robots? Evidence from a Survey

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  • Morikawa, Masayuki

Abstract

This study, using original survey data of 10,000 individuals, analyzes the possible impacts of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics on employment. The first interest of this study is to ascertain, from the viewpoint of workers, what types of worker characteristics are associated with the perception of risk of jobs being replaced by the development of AI and robotics. The second interest is to identify, from the viewpoint of consumers, what types of services are likely to be replaced by AI and robotics. The results suggest that malleable/adaptable high skills acquired through higher education, particularly in science and engineering, are complementary with new technologies such as AI and robotics. At the same time, occupation-specific skills acquired by attending professional schools or holding occupational licenses, particularly those related to human-intensive services, are less likely to be replaced by AI and robotics.

Suggested Citation

  • Morikawa, Masayuki, 2017. "Who Are Afraid of Losing Their Jobs to Artificial Intelligence and Robots? Evidence from a Survey," GLO Discussion Paper Series 71, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:71
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ivanov, Stanislav Hristov & Kuyumdzhiev, Mihail & Webster, Craig, 2020. "Automation fears: drivers and solutions," SocArXiv jze3u, Center for Open Science.
    2. Caselli, Mauro & Fracasso, Andrea & Marcolin, Arianna & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2021. "The reassuring effect of firms' technological innovations on workers' job insecurity," GLO Discussion Paper Series 938, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Abeliansky, Ana Lucia & Beulmann, Matthias, 2019. "Are they coming for us? Industrial robots and the mental health of workers," University of Göttingen Working Papers in Economics 379, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. HAMAGUCHI Nobuaki & KONDO Keisuke, 2018. "Regional Employment and Artificial Intelligence in Japan," Discussion papers 18032, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    5. Ivanov, Stanislav & Kuyumdzhiev, Mihail & Webster, Craig, 2020. "Automation fears: Drivers and solutions," Technology in Society, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    6. Tom Coupé, 2018. "Robots, Job Characteristics and Job Insecurity," Working Papers in Economics 18/05, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    7. Kovács, Olivér, 2022. "Inkluzív kormányzás az ipar 4.0 korában - Japán példája [Inclusive governance in the age of Industry 4.0 - The example of Japan]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 255-277.
    8. Arntz, Melanie & Blesse, Sebastian & Doerrenberg, Philipp, 2022. "The end of work is near, isn't it? Survey evidence on automation angst," ZEW Discussion Papers 22-036, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    artificial intelligence; robotics; skill; household production;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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