IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/eti/dpaper/16066.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Effects of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics on Business and Employment: Evidence from a survey on Japanese firms

Author

Listed:
  • MORIKAWA Masayuki

Abstract

This study presents new evidence on firms' attitudes toward artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, as well as their attitude toward the impacts of these new technologies on future business and employment prospects. The data used in this paper are the results of our original survey of more than 3,000 Japanese firms. The major findings can be summarized as follows. First, firms operating in the service industry have a positive attitude on the effects of AI-related technologies, suggesting the importance of paying attention to "AI-using industries." Second, we observe complementarity between AI-related technologies and the skill level of employees. This finding suggests that in order to accelerate the development and diffusion of AI and to maintain employment opportunities, it will be necessary to upgrade human capital. Third, firms that engage in global markets tend to have a positive attitude toward the impacts of AI-related technologies, indicating that globalization of economic activities will facilitate the development and diffusion of these new technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2016. "The Effects of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics on Business and Employment: Evidence from a survey on Japanese firms," Discussion papers 16066, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:16066
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/16e066.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alan B. Krueger, 1993. "How Computers Have Changed the Wage Structure: Evidence from Microdata, 1984–1989," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 33-60.
    2. repec:tpr:restat:v:100:y:2018:i:5:p:753-768 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Georg Graetz & Guy Michaels, 2018. "Robots at Work," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(5), pages 753-768, December.
    4. Van Reenen, John, 2011. "Wage inequality, technology and trade: 21st century evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 730-741.
    5. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376.
    6. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2007. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-133, February.
    7. Frey, Carl Benedikt & Osborne, Michael A., 2017. "The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 254-280.
    8. David H. Autor, 2015. "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 3-30, Summer.
    9. Masayuki Morikawa, 2015. "Postgraduate Education and Labor Market Outcomes: An Empirical Analysis Using Micro Data from Japan," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(3), pages 499-520, July.
    10. Kevin J. Stiroh, 2002. "Information Technology and the U.S. Productivity Revival: What Do the Industry Data Say?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1559-1576, December.
    11. Georg Graetz & Guy Michaels, 2015. "Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 447, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    12. Lechevalier, Sébastien & Nishimura, Junichi & Storz, Cornelia, 2014. "Diversity in patterns of industry evolution: How an intrapreneurial regime contributed to the emergence of the service robot industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(10), pages 1716-1729.
    13. Joel Mokyr & Chris Vickers & Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2015. "The History of Technological Anxiety and the Future of Economic Growth: Is This Time Different?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 31-50, Summer.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:16066. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (TANIMOTO, Toko). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rietijp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.