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Measuring Gender Attitudes Using List Experiments

Author

Listed:
  • Asadullah, M Niaz
  • De Cao, Elisabetta
  • Khatoon, Fathema Zhura
  • Siddique, Zahra

Abstract

We elicit adolescent girls’ attitudes towards intimate partner violence and child marriage using purposefully collected data from rural Bangladesh. Alongside direct survey questions, we conduct list experiments to elicit true preferences for intimate partner violence and marriage before age eighteen. Responses to direct survey questions suggest that very few adolescent girls in the study accept the practises of intimate partner violence and child marriage (5% and 2%). However, our list experiments reveal significantly higher support for both intimate partner violence and child marriage (at 30% and 24%). We further investigate how numerous variables relate to preferences for egalitarian gender norms in rural Bangladesh.

Suggested Citation

  • Asadullah, M Niaz & De Cao, Elisabetta & Khatoon, Fathema Zhura & Siddique, Zahra, 2020. "Measuring Gender Attitudes Using List Experiments," GLO Discussion Paper Series 658, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:658
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 1st February 2021
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2021-02-01 12:00:03

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    list experiment; indirect response survey methods; intimate partner violence; child marriage; Bangladesh;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods

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