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Forecast-error-based estimation of forecast uncertainty when the horizon is increased

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  • Knüppel, Malte

Abstract

Recently, several institutions have increased their forecast horizons, and many institutions rely on their past forecast errors to estimate measures of forecast uncertainty. This work addresses the question how the latter estimation can be accomplished if there are only very few errors available for the new forecast horizons. It extends upon the results of Knüppel (2014) in order to relax the condition on the data structure required for the SUR estimator to be independent from unknown quantities. It turns out that the SUR estimator of forecast uncertainty tends to deliver large efficiency gains compared to the OLS estimator (i.e. the sample mean of the squared forecast errors) in the case of increased forecast horizons. The SUR estimator is applied to the forecast errors of the Bank of England and the FOMC.

Suggested Citation

  • Knüppel, Malte, 2014. "Forecast-error-based estimation of forecast uncertainty when the horizon is increased," Discussion Papers 40/2014, Deutsche Bundesbank.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:bubdps:402014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Travis J. Berge, 2020. "Time-varying Uncertainty of the Federal Reserve’s Output Gap Estimate," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-012, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    multi-step-ahead forecasts; forecast error variance; SUR;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods

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