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Supply-side effects of strong energy price hikes in German industry and transportation

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  • Knetsch, Thomas A.
  • Molzahn, Alexander

Abstract

The paper studies the short-term effects of energy price hikes on the supply of industrial goods and transport services including the repercussions on remuneration of input factors. While industry had suffered more strongly from the oil price shock of the late 1970s compared with the one of the early 1970s and the 2004-08 upsurge, evidence is reverse for transportation. Regarding the impact on the income distribution, both sectors share the pattern that in the recent episode rising energy costs were more than compensated by falling unit labor costs while in the 1970s cost structures had been strained by expansive wage policy in addition to the oil price shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Knetsch, Thomas A. & Molzahn, Alexander, 2009. "Supply-side effects of strong energy price hikes in German industry and transportation," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2009,26, Deutsche Bundesbank.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:bubdp1:200926
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Solaymani, Saeed & Kari, Fatimah, 2013. "Environmental and economic effects of high petroleum prices on transport sector," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 435-441.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy prices; supply of goods and services; income distribution;

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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