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Missing work is a pain: the effect of Cox-2 inhibitors on sickness absence and disability pension receipt

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  • Bütikofer, A.
  • Skira, M.

Abstract

How does medical innovation affect labor supply? We analyze how the availability of Cox-2 inhibitors, pharmaceuticals used for treating pain and inflammation, affected the sickness absence and disability pension receipt of individuals with joint pain. We exploit the market entry of the Cox-2 inhibitor Vioxx and its sudden market withdrawal as exogenous sources of variation in drug use. Using Norwegian administrative data, we find Vioxx's entry decreased quarterly sickness absence days among individuals with joint pain by 7-11 percent. The withdrawal increased sickness days by 12-21 percent and increased the quarterly probability of receiving disabilitybenefits by 0.4-0.6 percentage points.

Suggested Citation

  • Bütikofer, A. & Skira, M., 2015. "Missing work is a pain: the effect of Cox-2 inhibitors on sickness absence and disability pension receipt," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/13, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:15/13
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    Cited by:

    1. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Keshar M. Ghimire & Lauren Hersch Nicholas, 2017. "Medical Marijuana Laws and Disability Applications, Receipts, and Terminations," NBER Working Papers 23862, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Janet Currie & Jonas Y. Jin & Molly Schnell, 2018. "U.S. Employment and Opioids: Is There a Connection?," NBER Working Papers 24440, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Harris, Matthew & Kessler, Lawrence & Murray, Matthew & Glenn, Beth, 2017. "Prescription Opioids and Labor Market Pains: The Effect of Schedule II Opioids on Labor Force Participation and Unemployment," MPRA Paper 86586, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 28 Mar 2018.
    4. Buetikofer, Aline & Cronin, Christopher & Skira, Meghan, 2019. "Employment Effects of Healthcare Policy: Evidence from the 2007 FDA Black Box Warning on Antidepressants," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 1/2019, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    5. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Lauren Hersch Nicholas & Keshar M. Ghimire, 2017. "The Impact of State Medical Marijuana Laws on Social Security Disability Insurance and Workers' Compensation Benefit Claiming," Working Papers id:12111, eSocialSciences.

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