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Does the letter matter (and for everyone)? Quasi-experimental evidence on the effects of home invitation on mammography uptake

Author

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  • Carrieri, V.
  • Wuebker, A.

Abstract

We exploit regional variation in the availability of breast cancer screening policies and variations in age eligibility criteria across European regions to estimate the causal effect of home invitation on mammography uptake. We link administrative public data about regional breast cancer screening policies from various sources to individual Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) data. We find that home invitation increases mammography uptakes by around 24 percentage points. At the same time, we find that home invitation reduces education-related inequalities but increases gradient in the use related to cognitive functions. In addition, significant effects on mammography use are found only when at least 50 per cent of the population is reached by the home invitation. Our results suggest that an exogenous informational shock significantly affects preventive decisions especially among less informed individuals but the effectiveness of the informational shock is strongly reduced for women who are less able to process information.

Suggested Citation

  • Carrieri, V. & Wuebker, A., 2014. "Does the letter matter (and for everyone)? Quasi-experimental evidence on the effects of home invitation on mammography uptake," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:14/11
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spr:eujhec:v:18:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10198-016-0845-7 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    home invitation; preventive health care; quasi-experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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