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Who has a clue to preventing the flu? Unravelling supply and demand effects on the take-up of influenza vaccinations

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  • Jürgen Maurer

    () (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA))

Abstract

Influenza is a serious disease, especially for older people, and incomplete vaccination take-up poses a major public health challenge. On both the side of physicians and patients, there could be promising channels for increasing immunization rates, but no attempt has yet been made to empirically unravel their respective influences. Using exclusion restrictions implied by an economic model of physician-patient interactions, our study quantifies the particular effects of supply and demand on influenza immunization. On the supply side, our estimates highlight the importance of physician agency and physician quality, while a patient’s education and health behaviors are key demand side factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Jürgen Maurer, 2008. "Who has a clue to preventing the flu? Unravelling supply and demand effects on the take-up of influenza vaccinations," MEA discussion paper series 08170, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:08170
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    11. Kenkel, Don, 1990. "Consumer Health Information and the Demand for Medical Care," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(4), pages 587-595, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carrieri, V. & Wuebker, A., 2014. "Does the letter matter (and for everyone)? Quasi-experimental evidence on the effects of home invitation on mammography uptake," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Kristian Bolin & Daniel Hedblom & Anna Lindgren & Bjorn Lindgren, 2010. "Asymmetric Information and the Demand for Voluntary Health Insurance in Europe," NBER Working Papers 15689, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert Nuscheler & Kerstin Roeder, 2016. "To Vaccinate or to Procrastinate? That is the Prevention Question," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(12), pages 1560-1581, December.
    4. Pichler, Stefan & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2017. "The pros and cons of sick pay schemes: Testing for contagious presenteeism and noncontagious absenteeism behavior," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 14-33.
    5. Stefan Pichler & Nicolas Ziebarth, 2016. "The Pros and Cons of Sick Pay Schemes: Testing for Contagious Presenteeism and Shirking Behavior," NBER Chapters,in: Social Insurance Programs (Trans-Atlantic Public Economic Seminar - TAPES) National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Nicolas Bouckaert & Erik Schokkaert, 2016. "Differing types of medical prevention appeal to different individuals," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(3), pages 317-337, April.
    7. Aniko Biro;, 2012. "An analysis of mammography decisions with a focus on educational differences," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    8. Pichler, Stefan & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2015. "The Pros and Cons of Sick Pay Schemes: A Method to Test for Contagious Presenteeism and Shirking Behavior," IZA Discussion Papers 8850, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Stroka-Wetsch, Magdalena A. & Talmann, Anna & Linder, Roland, 2016. "Does competition in the out-patient sector improve quality of medical care? Evidence from administrative data," Ruhr Economic Papers 638, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    10. Drerup, Tilman & Enke, Benjamin & Gaudecker, Hans-Martin von, 2014. "Measurement Error in Subjective Expectations and the Empirical Content of Economic Models," IZA Discussion Papers 8535, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Aisa, Rosa & Larramona, Gemma & Pueyo, Fernando, 2015. "Active aging, preventive health and dependency: Heterogeneous workers, differential behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 1-9.
    12. Vincenzo Carrieri & Ansgar Wuebker, 2016. "Quasi-Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Health Information on Preventive Behaviour in Europe," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(6), pages 765-791, December.
    13. Slusky, David J. G. & Zeckhauser, Richard J., 2018. "Sunlight and Protection Against Influenza," Working Paper Series rwp18-007, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    14. Udo Schneider & Jürgen Zerth, 2011. "Improving Prevention Compliance through Appropriate Incentives: Theoretical Modelling and Empirical Evidence," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 147(I), pages 71-106, March.
    15. Slusky, David J. G. & Zeckhauser, Richard J., 2018. "Sunlight and Protection Against Influenza," Working Paper Series rwp18-007, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    16. repec:kap:atlecj:v:45:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11293-017-9540-z is not listed on IDEAS
    17. repec:eee:econom:v:200:y:2017:i:2:p:378-389 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Maurer, J. & Harris, K.M., 2015. "Learning to trust flu shots: quasi-experimental evidence on the role of learning in influenza vaccination decisions from the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 (swine flu) pandemic," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/19, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

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