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Consumer Demand for Health Information on the Internet

Author

Listed:
  • M. Kate Bundorf
  • Laurence Baker
  • Sara Singer
  • Todd Wagner

Abstract

The challenges consumers face in acquiring and using information are a defining feature of health care markets. In this paper, we examine demand for health information on the Internet. We find that individuals in poor health are more likely than those in better health to use the Internet to search for health information and to communicate with others about health and health care. We also find that individuals facing a higher price to obtain information from health care professionals are more likely to turn to the Internet for health information. Our findings indicate that demand for consumer health information depends on the expected benefits of information and the price of information substitutes.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Kate Bundorf & Laurence Baker & Sara Singer & Todd Wagner, 2004. "Consumer Demand for Health Information on the Internet," NBER Working Papers 10386, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10386
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Joan Costa i Font & Joan Gil, "undated". "Are there Socio-Economic Inequalities in Obesity in Spain?," Studies on the Spanish Economy 217, FEDEA.
    2. Dwyer, Debra Sabatini & Liu, Hong, 2013. "The impact of consumer health information on the demand for health services," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-11.
    3. F. Barigozzi & R. Levaggi, 2006. "A Rationale for Searching (Imprecise) Health Information," Working Papers 559, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    4. Costa-Font, Joan & Gil, Joan, 2008. "What lies behind socio-economic inequalities in obesity in Spain A decomposition approach," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 61-73, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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