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Variations in preventive care utilisation in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Nicolas Sirven
  • Zeynep Or
  • Florence Jusot

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Université Paris-Dauphine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Prevention has been identified as an effective strategy to lead healthy, active and independent lives in old age. Developing effective prevention programs requires understanding the influence of both individual and health system level factors on utilisation of specific services. This study examines the variations in utilisation of preventive services by the population aged 50 and over in 14 European countries, pooling data from the two waves of Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe and the British Household Panel Survey. The models used allow for the impact of individual level demand-side characteristics and supply-side health systems features to be separately identified. The analysis shows significant variations in preventive care utilisation both within and across European countries. In all countries, controlling for individual health status and country-level systemic differences, higher educated and higher income groups use more preventive services. At the health system level, high public health expenditures and high GP density is associated with a high level of preventive care use, but specialist density does not appear to have any effect. Moreover, payment schemes for GPs and specialists appear to significantly affect the incentives to provide preventive health care. In systems where doctors are paid by fee-for-service the utilisation of all health services, including cancer screening, are higher.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolas Sirven & Zeynep Or & Florence Jusot, 2012. "Variations in preventive care utilisation in Europe," Post-Print hal-01593796, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01593796
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01593796
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Carrieri, V. & Wuebker, A., 2014. "Does the letter matter (and for everyone)? Quasi-experimental evidence on the effects of home invitation on mammography uptake," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Marion Devaux, 2015. "Income-related inequalities and inequities in health care services utilisation in 18 selected OECD countries," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(1), pages 21-33, January.
    3. BOUCKAERT, Nicolas & SCHOKKAERT, Erik, 2013. "Differing types of medical prevention appeal to different individuals," CORE Discussion Papers 2013038, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    4. repec:spr:ijphth:v:63:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00038-017-1045-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Aniko Biro;, 2012. "An analysis of mammography decisions with a focus on educational differences," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot, 2012. "Intergenerational transmission of health care habits in France," Post-Print hal-01593803, HAL.
    7. Nicolas Bouckaert & Erik Schokkaert, 2016. "Differing types of medical prevention appeal to different individuals," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(3), pages 317-337, April.
    8. repec:kap:atlecj:v:46:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s11293-018-9602-x is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:eee:hepoli:v:122:y:2018:i:4:p:422-430 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:ifs:fistud:v:38:y:2017:i::p:445-468 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:jhecon:v:58:y:2018:i:c:p:228-252 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Vincenzo Carrieri & Ansgar Wuebker, 2016. "Quasi-Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Health Information on Preventive Behaviour in Europe," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(6), pages 765-791, December.
    13. Joan Costa‐Font & Edward C. Norton & Luigi Siciliani & Vincenzo Carrieri & Cinzia Di Novi & Cristina Elisa Orso, 2017. "Home Sweet Home? Public Financing and Inequalities in the Use of Home Care Services in Europe," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 38, pages 445-468, September.
    14. repec:eee:hepoli:v:122:y:2018:i:10:p:1070-1077 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:eee:rensus:v:107:y:2019:i:c:p:338-359 is not listed on IDEAS

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