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Electricity consumption, Education Expenditure and Economic Growth in Chinese Cities

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  • Fang, Zheng

    () (School of Business, SIM University, Singapore)

  • Chen, Yang

    () (Division of Economics, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University)

Abstract

We examine the city-level cointegrating and Granger causal relationships between economic growth, electricity consumption and human capital during a period of 2003-2012 in China. Applying the Continuously-updated fully modified OLS panel estimation, we find that for China as a whole physical and human capital have similar positive impacts on local economic growth, which are slightly larger than the effect of electricity consumption. A 1% rise in either physical or human capital investment boosts economic growth by 0.07% and the output elasticity of electricity consumption is 0.06. Comparatively, electricity consumption plays a dominant role to boost economic growth in the Center, human capital contributes most to growth in the East, and growth in the West benefits most from physical capital investments. Using a Granger causality test that is suitable for heterogeneous panels, we find a uni-directional causal relationship running from economic growth to electricity consumption in central and western China and a feedback effect in eastern China. In terms of the causal relationship between electricity consumption and education expenditure, electricity Granger causes education expenditure in some eastern Chinese cities and a reverse relationship is observed for cities in Middle China, while for western cities a bi-directional causal link is found. Local policies should therefore vary and be coordinated across government agencies.

Suggested Citation

  • Fang, Zheng & Chen, Yang, 2017. "Electricity consumption, Education Expenditure and Economic Growth in Chinese Cities," RIEI Working Papers 2017-02, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Research Institute for Economic Integration.
  • Handle: RePEc:xjt:rieiwp:2017-02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Electricity consumption; education expenditure; heterogeneous panel causality; Chinese cities;

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