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Electricity supply, employment and real GDP in India: evidence from cointegration and Granger-causality tests

  • Ghosh, Sajal
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    This study probes nexus between electricity supply, employment and real GDP for India within a multivariate framework using autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach of cointegration. Long-run equilibrium relationship has been established among these variables for the time span 1970-71 to 2005-06. The study further establishes long- and short-run Granger causality running from real GDP and electricity supply to employment without any feedback effect. Thus, growth in real GDP and electricity supply are responsible for the high level of employment in India. The absence of causality running from electricity supply to real GDP implies that electricity demand and supply side measures can be adopted to reduce the wastage of electricity, which would not affect future economic growth of India.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V2W-4W5M0GH-1/2/dd274adeefa9852fa166cf81328d553d
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 8 (August)
    Pages: 2926-2929

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:8:p:2926-2929
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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