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Disaggregated industrial energy consumption and GDP: the case of Shanghai, 1952-1999

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  • Wolde-Rufael, Yemane

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  • Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2004. "Disaggregated industrial energy consumption and GDP: the case of Shanghai, 1952-1999," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 69-75, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:26:y:2004:i:1:p:69-75
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    1. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Pittis, Nikitas, 1999. " Efficient Estimation of Cointegrating Vectors and Testing for Causality in Vector Autoregressions," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 1-35, February.
    2. Yang, Hao-Yen, 2000. "A note on the causal relationship between energy and GDP in Taiwan," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 309-317, June.
    3. Tsangyao Chang & Wenshwo Fang & Li-Fang Wen, 2001. "Energy consumption, employment, output, and temporal causality: evidence from Taiwan based on cointegration and error-correction modelling techniques," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(8), pages 1045-1056.
    4. Masih, Abul M. M. & Masih, Rumi, 1996. "Energy consumption, real income and temporal causality: results from a multi-country study based on cointegration and error-correction modelling techniques," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 165-183, July.
    5. Benjamin S. Cheng, 1998. "Energy Consumption, Employment and Causality in Japan: A Multivariate Approach," Indian Economic Review, Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, vol. 33(1), pages 19-29, January.
    6. Cheng, Benjamin S. & Lai, Tin Wei, 1997. "An investigation of co-integration and causality between energy consumption and economic activity in Taiwan," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 435-444, October.
    7. Shan, Jordan & Tian, Gary Gang, 1998. "Causality between Exports and Economic Growth: The Empirical Evidence from Shanghai," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(2), pages 195-202, June.
    8. Glasure, Yong U. & Lee, Aie-Rie, 1998. "Cointegration, error-correction, and the relationship between GDP and energy: The case of South Korea and Singapore," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 17-25, March.
    9. Zapata, Hector O & Rambaldi, Alicia N, 1997. "Monte Carlo Evidence on Cointegration and Causation," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 59(2), pages 285-298, May.
    10. Hondroyiannis, George & Lolos, Sarantis & Papapetrou, Evangelia, 2002. "Energy consumption and economic growth: assessing the evidence from Greece," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 319-336, July.
    11. Asafu-Adjaye, John, 2000. "The relationship between energy consumption, energy prices and economic growth: time series evidence from Asian developing countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 615-625, December.
    12. Glasure, Yong U., 2002. "Energy and national income in Korea: further evidence on the role of omitted variables," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 355-365, July.
    13. Eiji Kurozumi & Taku Yamamoto, 2000. "Modified lag augmented vector autoregressions," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 207-231.
    14. Toda, Hiro Y. & Yamamoto, Taku, 1995. "Statistical inference in vector autoregressions with possibly integrated processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1-2), pages 225-250.
    15. Benjamin Cheng, 1997. "Energy consumption and economic growth in Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela: a time series analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(11), pages 671-674.
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