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Energy Consumption, Employment and Causality in Japan: A Multivariate Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Benjamin S. Cheng

    (Southern University)

Abstract

Using Hsiao's version of Granger causality and cointegration, this study finds that employment (EP), energy consumption (EC), Real GNP (RGNP) and capital are not cointegrated. EC is found to negatively cause EP whereas EP and RNGP are found to directly cause EC. It is also found that capital negatively Granger-causes EP while RGNP and EP are found to strongly influence EC. The findings of this study seem to suggest that a policy of energy conservation may not be detrimental to a country such as Japan. In addition, the finding that energy and capital are substitutes implies that energy conservation will promote capital formation, given output constant.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin S. Cheng, 1998. "Energy Consumption, Employment and Causality in Japan: A Multivariate Approach," Indian Economic Review, Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, vol. 33(1), pages 19-29, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:dse:indecr:v:33:y:1998:i:1:p:19-29
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Camarero, Mariam & Forte, Anabel & Garcia-Donato, Gonzalo & Mendoza, Yurena & Ordoñez, Javier, 2015. "Variable selection in the analysis of energy consumption–growth nexus," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 207-216.
    2. Omri, Anis, 2014. "An international literature survey on energy-economic growth nexus: Evidence from country-specific studies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 951-959.
    3. Fallahi, Firouz, 2011. "Causal relationship between energy consumption (EC) and GDP: A Markov-switching (MS) causality," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 4165-4170.
    4. Jalil, Abdul, 2014. "Energy–growth conundrum in energy exporting and importing countries: Evidence from heterogeneous panel methods robust to cross-sectional dependence," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 314-324.
    5. Tiba, Sofien & Omri, Anis, 2017. "Literature survey on the relationships between energy, environment and economic growth," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 1129-1146.
    6. Arouri, Mohamed El Hedi & Ben Youssef, Adel & M'henni, Hatem & Rault, Christophe, 2014. "Exploring the Causality Links between Energy and Employment in African Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 8296, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Ajmi, Ahdi Noomen & El Montasser, Ghassen & Nguyen, Duc Khuong, 2013. "Testing the relationships between energy consumption and income in G7 countries with nonlinear causality tests," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 126-133.
    8. Farzana Sharmin & Mohammed Robayet Khan & Mohammed Robayet Khan, 2016. "A Causal Relationship between Energy Consumption, Energy Prices and Economic Growth in Africa," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 477-494.
    9. Zhang, Wei & Yang, Shuyun, 2013. "The influence of energy consumption of China on its real GDP from aggregated and disaggregated viewpoints," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 76-81.
    10. Waseem Ahmad & Tanvir Ahmed, 2014. "Energy Sources and Gross Domestic Product: International Evidence," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 53(4), pages 477-490.
    11. repec:eee:eneeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:262-271 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Ozturk, Ilhan, 2010. "A literature survey on energy-growth nexus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 340-349, January.
    13. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Zakaria, Muhammad & Syed, Jawad & Kumar, Mantu, 2018. "The Energy Consumption and Economic Growth Nexus in Top Ten Energy-Consuming Countries: Fresh Evidence from Using the Quantile-on-Quantile Approach," MPRA Paper 84920, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Mar 2018.
    14. Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2004. "Disaggregated industrial energy consumption and GDP: the case of Shanghai, 1952-1999," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 69-75, January.
    15. Sofien, Tiba & Omri, Anis, 2016. "Literature survey on the relationships between energy variables, environment and economic growth," MPRA Paper 82555, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Sep 2016.
    16. Rafindadi, Abdulkadir Abdulrashid & Ozturk, Ilhan, 2016. "Effects of financial development, economic growth and trade on electricity consumption: Evidence from post-Fukushima Japan," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1073-1084.
    17. Chang, Ching-Chih & Soruco Carballo, Claudia Fabiola, 2011. "Energy conservation and sustainable economic growth: The case of Latin America and the Caribbean," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4215-4221, July.
    18. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-475 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Mohammadi, Hassan & Amin, Modhurima Dey, 2015. "Long-run relation and short-run dynamics in energy consumption–output relationship: International evidence from country panels with different growth rates," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 118-126.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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