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Do Job Disamenities Raise Wages or Ruin Job Satisfaction?

Author

Listed:
  • Petri Böckerman

    (Labour Institute for Economic Research)

  • Pekka Ilmakunnas

    (Helsinki School of Economics)

Abstract

This study investigates the role of adverse working conditions in the determination of individual wages and overall job satisfaction in the Finnish labour market. The potential influence of adverse working conditions on self-reported fairness of pay at the workplace is considered as an alternative, indirect measure of job satisfaction. The results show that working conditions have a very minor role in the determination of individual wages in the Finnish labour market. In contrast, adverse working conditions substantially increase the level of job dissatisfaction and the perception of unfairness of pay at the workplace.

Suggested Citation

  • Petri Böckerman & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2005. "Do Job Disamenities Raise Wages or Ruin Job Satisfaction?," Labor and Demography 0501001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0501001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Omotayo Adewale OSIBANJO & Oladele Joseph KEHIDE & Abolaji Joachim ABIODUN, 2011. "Human Resource Management and Employee Job Satisfaction: Evidence from the Nigerian Banking Industry," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 8, pages 185-195, December.
    2. Bocquier, Philippe & Nordman, Christophe J. & Vescovo, Aude, 2010. "Employment Vulnerability and Earnings in Urban West Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 1297-1314, September.
    3. Aysit Tansel & Saziye Gazîoglu, 2014. "Management-employee relations, firm size and job satisfaction," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(8), pages 1260-1275, October.
    4. Böckerman, Petri & Ilmakunnas, Pekka & Johansson, Edvard, 2011. "Job security and employee well-being: Evidence from matched survey and register data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 547-554, August.
    5. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4294 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ambra Poggi, 2007. "Do Satisfactory Working Conditions Contribute to Explaining Earning Differentials in Italy? A Panel Data Approach," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(4‐5), pages 713-733, December.
    7. Böckerman, Petri & Ilmakunnas, Pekka & Jokisaari, Markku & Vuori, Jukka, 2008. "Who stay unwillingly in a job?," MPRA Paper 11066, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Nikolaos Georgantzis & Efi Vasileiou, 2014. "Are Dangerous Jobs Paid Better? European Evidence," Research in Labor Economics, in: Solomon W. Polachek & Konstantinos Tatsiramos (ed.), New Analyses of Worker Well-Being, volume 38, pages 163-192, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    9. Michela Ponzo, 2012. "On-the-job Search in Italian Labor Markets: An Empirical Analysis," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 213-232, July.
    10. Petri Böckerman & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2005. "Job disamenities, job satisfaction, and on-the-job search: is there a nexus?," Labor and Demography 0501002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Thomas Cornelißen, 2009. "The Interaction of Job Satisfaction, Job Search, and Job Changes. An Empirical Investigation with German Panel Data," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 367-384, June.
    12. Johansson, Edvard, 2004. "Job Satisfaction in Finland - Some results from the European Community Household Panel 1996-2001," Discussion Papers 958, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    13. Olena Nizalova, 2014. "Inequality in Total Returns to Work in Ukraine: Taking A Closer Look at Workplace (Dis)amenities," Discussion Papers 52, Kyiv School of Economics.
    14. Aysit Tansel & Saziye Gazîoglu, 2014. "Management-employee relations, firm size and job satisfaction," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(8), pages 1260-1275, October.
    15. Ndamsa Dickson Thomas & Baye Mendjo Francis & Epo Boniface Ngah, 2013. "Responsiveness of Private Sector Household Income to Employment Vulnerability in Cameroon," EuroEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 1(32), pages 153-177, May.
    16. Böckerman, Petri & Ilmakunnas, Pekka & Johansson, Edvard, 2009. "Creative destruction and employee well-being," MPRA Paper 15447, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Böckerman, Petri & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2006. "Interaction of job disamenities, job satisfaction, and sickness absences: Evidence from a representative sample of Finnish workers," MPRA Paper 1800, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    compensating wage differentials; job satisfaction; working conditions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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