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Who values the family-friendly aspects of a job? Evidence from the Japanese labour market

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  • Tadashi Sakai
  • Naomi Miyazato

Abstract

type="main"> Women with family responsibilities such as child-rearing generally prefer jobs with flexible working conditions. According to the theory of compensating wage differentials, women working in such family-friendly jobs are paid less than those working in family-unfriendly jobs. The present paper investigates whose wages are more greatly affected by the family-(un)friendly aspects of their jobs. Based on a longitudinal survey of Japanese women, we found that among several family-(un)friendly attributes of a job, only commuting time requires a wage premium, and most of the premium is associated with job changes made by part-time-working married women.

Suggested Citation

  • Tadashi Sakai & Naomi Miyazato, 2014. "Who values the family-friendly aspects of a job? Evidence from the Japanese labour market," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 397-413, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:65:y:2014:i:3:p:397-413
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jere.12022
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ms. Chie Aoyagi & Alistair Munro, 2019. "Guilt, Gender, and Work-Life Balance in Japan: A Choice Experiment," IMF Working Papers 2019/261, International Monetary Fund.
    2. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2018. "Long Commuting Time and the Benefits of Telecommuting," Discussion papers 18025, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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