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Insecurity of Employment and Work-Life Balance: From the viewpoint of compensating wage differentials

  • MORIKAWA Masayuki

This paper presents survey-based evidence on the "fair" compensating wage differentials for insecurity of employment and lack of work-life balance (WLB). We present facts about individual perceptions of the desirable compensating differentials and then estimate the effects of working hours and wages on job satisfaction. The fair wage premiums for insecurity of employment and lack of WLB are both around 10% to 20%. The actual relative wages of nonstandard workers seem to be lower than those in the hedonic equilibrium. If "short-hour regular jobs" are characterized by both strong employment protection and WLB, the relative wage discount of 10% to 20% coincides with the average worker's perception of fairness. Working hours have a negative effect on job satisfaction and the wage level has a positive effect on job satisfaction, but the magnitudes of the effects differ between male and female workers. In order to achieve diversity of working styles, work schedule flexibility should be accompanied by a wage adjustment, which would contribute to the adoption and diffusion of WLB practices.

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Paper provided by Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI) in its series Discussion papers with number 10052.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:10052
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  1. Nick Bloom & Tobias Kretschmer & John Van Reenen, 2006. "Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity," CEP Special Papers 16, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Booth, Alison L. & Wood, Margi, 2006. "Back-to-front Down-under? Part-time/Full-time Wage Differentials in Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 2268, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Booth, Alison L & van Ours, Jan C, 2005. "Hours of Work and Gender Identity: Does Part-Time Work Make the Family Happier?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5438, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Booth, Alison L. & van Ours, Jan C., 2007. "Job Satisfaction and Family Happiness: The Part-time Work Puzzle," IZA Discussion Papers 3020, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Emilia Del Bono & Andrea Weber, 2008. "Do Wages Compensate for Anticipated Working Time Restrictions? Evidence from Seasonal Employment in Austria," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 181-221.
  6. Nick Bloom & John Van Reenen, 2006. "Management Practices, Work--L ife Balance, and Productivity: A Review of Some Recent Evidence," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 457-482, Winter.
  7. Lanfranchi, Joseph & Ohlsson, Henry & Skalli, Ali, 2002. "Compensating wage differentials and shift work preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 393-398, February.
  8. Ernesto Villanueva, 2007. "Estimating Compensating Wage Differentials Using Voluntary Job Changes: Evidence from Germany," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(4), pages 544-561, July.
  9. Hwang, Hae-shin & Reed, W Robert & Hubbard, Carlton, 1992. "Compensating Wage Differentials and Unobserved Productivity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 835-58, August.
  10. John S. Heywood & W. Stanley Siebert & Xiangdong Wei, 2007. "The implicit wage costs of family friendly work practices," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(2), pages 275-300, April.
  11. Usui, Emiko, 2008. "Job satisfaction and the gender composition of jobs," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 23-26, April.
  12. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2010. "Volatility, Nonstandard Employment, and Productivity: An empirical analysis using firm-level data," Discussion papers 10025, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
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