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Better Safe than Sorry? The Effects of Income Risk and Unemployment Risk on Wages

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  • Wolfgang Nagl

Abstract

We study the effects of income risk and unemployment risk on individual wages simultaneously. Starting point for the empirical analysis is a portfolio model for the labor market. This model shows positive wage effects for both risks but also a negative interaction effect. Using German administrative panel data we estimate the effects of the income risk, the unemployment risk and their interaction on individual wages separately for men and women in East and West Germany. We find the expected positive wage effects for both risks as well as a negative interaction effect. The marginal effect of income risk on wages is positive, whereas the marginal effect of unemployment risk is negative.

Suggested Citation

  • Wolfgang Nagl, 2014. "Better Safe than Sorry? The Effects of Income Risk and Unemployment Risk on Wages," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(3), pages 251-268, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:28:y:2014:i:3:p:251-268
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/labr.12033
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