IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jrisku/v10y1995i1p57-70.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Unions, Employment Risks, and Market Provision of Employment Risk Differentials

Author

Listed:
  • Moore, Michael J

Abstract

The role of unions in providing compensating differentials for wage and hours risk is analyzed. Unions are shown to increase wages for workers in more risky jobs. A negative compensating differential for nonunion workers is taken as evidence of worker-specific, or supply-side risk. This component of risk is removed by controlling for union status, based on the belief that unionized firms will be more likely to filter out high-risk unproductive workers. Hours risk is compensated for in the labor market, while wage risk is not. Copyright 1995 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Moore, Michael J, 1995. "Unions, Employment Risks, and Market Provision of Employment Risk Differentials," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 57-70, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:10:y:1995:i:1:p:57-70
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wolfgang Nagl, 2012. "Better Safe than Sorry? The Effects of Income Risk, Unemployment Risk and the Interaction of these Risks on Wages," ifo Working Paper Series 148, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    2. Jung, Seeun & Choe, Chung & Oaxaca, Ronald L., 2016. "Gender Wage Gaps and Risky vs. Secure Employment: An Experimental Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 10132, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. SeEun Jung, 2017. "The gender wage gap and sample selection via risk attitudes," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(2), pages 318-335, May.
    4. Seeun Jung & Kenneth Houngbedji, 2014. "Shirking, Monitoring, and Risk Aversion," Working Papers halshs-00965532, HAL.
    5. Ragui Assaad & Insan Tunali, 2000. "Wage Formation and Recurrent Unemployment," Working Papers 2016, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 Aug 2000.
    6. Andrea Baranzini & Giovanni Ferro Luzzi, 2001. "The Economic Value of Risks to Life: Evidence from the Swiss Labour Market," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 137(II), pages 149-170, June.
    7. Stefan Arent & Wolfgang Nagl, 2011. "The Price of Security: On the Causality and Impact of Lay-off Risks on Wages," ifo Working Paper Series 100, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    8. Wolfgang Nagl, 2014. "Better Safe than Sorry? The Effects of Income Risk and Unemployment Risk on Wages," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(3), pages 251-268, September.
    9. Wolfgang Nagl, 2014. "Lohnrisiko und Altersarmut im Sozialstaat," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 54.
    10. Assaad, Ragui & Tunali, Insan, 2002. "Wage formation and recurrent unemployment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 17-61, February.
    11. Seeun Jung & Kenneth Houngbedji, 2014. "Shirking, Monitoring, and Risk Aversion," PSE Working Papers halshs-00965532, HAL.
    12. Bonin, Holger & Dohmen, Thomas & Falk, Armin & Huffman, David & Sunde, Uwe, 2007. "Cross-sectional earnings risk and occupational sorting: The role of risk attitudes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(6), pages 926-937, December.
    13. Angela Cipollone, 2011. "Education as a Precautionary Asset," Working Papers CELEG 1108, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
    14. Hartog, Joop & Vijverberg, Wim P.M., 2007. "On compensation for risk aversion and skewness affection in wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(6), pages 938-956, December.
    15. Seeun Jung, 2014. "The Gender Wage Gap and Sample Selection via Risk Attitudes," Working Papers halshs-00965520, HAL.
    16. Seeun JUNG, 2014. "Risk Attitudes and Shirking on the Quality of Work under Monitoring: Evidence from a Real-Effort Task Experiment," THEMA Working Papers 2014-26, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:10:y:1995:i:1:p:57-70. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.