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The Gender Wage Gap and Sample Selection via Risk Attitudes

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  • Seeun Jung

    (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics)

Abstract

This paper investigates a new way to estimate the gender wage gap with the introduction of individual risk attitudes using representative Korean data. We estimate the wage gap with correction for the selection bias, which latter results in the overestimation of this wage gap. Female workers are more risk averse. They hence prefer working in the public sector, where wages are generally lower than in the private sector. It goes on to explain the reduced gender wage gap by developing an appropriate sample-selection model, with wage decompositions corrected for selectivity. Self-selection based on risk attitudes therefore explains, in part, what is popularly perceived as gender discrimination.

Suggested Citation

  • Seeun Jung, 2014. "The Gender Wage Gap and Sample Selection via Risk Attitudes," PSE Working Papers halshs-00965520, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-00965520
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00965520v2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laszlo Goerke & Markus Pannenberg, 2012. "Risk Aversion and Trade-Union Membership," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(2), pages 275-295, June.
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    6. Cornelissen, Thomas & Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe, 2011. "Performance pay, risk attitudes and job satisfaction," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 229-239, April.
    7. Nicole M. Fortin, 2008. "The Gender Wage Gap among Young Adults in the United States: The Importance of Money versus People," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
    8. Seeun Jung & Kenneth Houngbedji, 2014. "Shirking, Monitoring, and Risk Aversion," PSE Working Papers halshs-00965532, HAL.
    9. Ekelund, Jesper & Johansson, Edvard & Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta & Lichtermann, Dirk, 2005. "Self-employment and risk aversion--evidence from psychological test data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(5), pages 649-659, October.
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    13. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-512, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Redmond, Paul & McGuinness, Seamus, 2017. "The Gender Wage Gap in Europe: Job Preferences, Gender Convergence and Distributional Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 10933, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. repec:dau:papers:123456789/15003 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jung, Seeun & Choe, Chung & Oaxaca, Ronald L., 2016. "Gender Wage Gaps and Risky vs. Secure Employment: An Experimental Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 10132, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Isabelle Bensidoun & Danièle Trancart, 2015. "The Gender Wage Gap in France: the Role of Non-Cognitive Characteristics," Working Papers DT/2015/08, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Occupational Choice; Gender Wage Gap; Risk Preference; Selection Bias;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection

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