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Anticipated Unemployment, Temporary Layoffs, and Compensating Wage Differentials

In: Studies in Labor Markets

  • John M. Abowd
  • Orley C. Ashenfelter

This paper models the competitive equilibrium wage rate when employment offers vary according to the amount of anticipated unemployment and unemployment risk. The competitive wage reflects a compensating differential which includes a certainty equivalent compensation proportional to the squared expected unemployment rate and a risk compensation proportional to the coefficient of unemployment variation. The factors of proportionality are half the inverse compensated labor supply elasticity and half the relative risk aversion, respectively. we use panel data to construct a model of anticipated unemployment and unemployment variance which depends on personal employment history, industry and economy-wide factors. Compensating wage differentials ranging from less than 1% to more than l4% are estimated for a two-digit industry classification over the years 1970 to 1975.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Sherwin Rosen, 1981. "Studies in Labor Markets," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number rose81-1, 07.
  • This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 8910.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8910
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    1. Orley C Ashenfelter & James Heckman, 1971. "The Estimation of Income and Substitution Effects in a Model of Family Labor Supply," Working Papers 402, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    2. Martin Neil Baily, 1974. "Wages and Employment under Uncertain Demand," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(1), pages 37-50.
    3. Zellner, Arnold, 1978. "Estimation of functions of population means and regression coefficients including structural coefficients : A minimum expected loss (MELO) approach," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 127-158, October.
    4. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
    5. Azariadis, Costas, 1975. "Implicit Contracts and Underemployment Equilibria," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(6), pages 1183-1202, December.
    6. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    7. Keeley, Michael C, et al, 1978. "The Estimation of Labor Supply Models Using Experimental Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(5), pages 873-87, December.
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