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Job Mobility among Workers with Disabilities

  • Marjorie Baldwin
  • Edward J. Schumacher

Using data from the 1990 Survey of Income and Program Participation, this paper examines both the mobility patterns of workers with disabilities and the wage effects of job changes by observing workers' within-firm and across-firm job changes over a 20-month period. There is no difference in the probability of internal (within-firm) job changes between workers with and without disabilities. Workers with disabilities, however, are slightly more likely to leave their current employer than are workers without disabilities. Examining the reasons for job changes, we find that disabled workers are significantly more likely to be discharged than nondisabled workers. While the overall wage growth for workers with disabilities is lower than that for nondisabled workers, there is little or no evidence that the wage changes associated with job changes are different for workers with disabilities. These findings are consistent with theories that disabled workers change jobs more frequently than nondisabled workers because of a greater incidence of job mismatch among workers with disabilities, or because of discrimination against disabled workers in job terminations.

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Paper provided by East Carolina University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 9911.

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Date of creation: Oct 1999
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Handle: RePEc:wop:eacaec:9911
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  1. Marjorie Baldwin & William G. Johnson, 1994. "Labor Market Discrimination against Men with Disabilities," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(1), pages 1-19.
  2. Henry S. Farber, 1998. "Mobility and Stability: The Dynamics of Job Change in Labor Markets," Working Papers 779, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Robert G. Valletta, 1996. "The Effects of Employer-Provided Health Insurance on Worker Mobility," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(3), pages 439-455, April.
  4. Chirikos, Thomas N. & Nestel, Gilbert, 1984. "Economic determinants and consequences of self-reported work disability," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 117-136, August.
  5. Madrian, Brigitte C, 1994. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is There Evidence of Job-Lock?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(1), pages 27-54, February.
  6. Alan Gustman & Thomas Steinmeier, 1990. "Pension Portability and Labor Mobility: Evidence From the Survey of Income and Program Participation," NBER Working Papers 3525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Harper, Barry, 1995. "Male Occupational Mobility in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(3), pages 349-69, August.
  8. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1990. "The Economic Well-Being of the Disabled: 1962-84," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(1), pages 32-54.
  9. David S. Salkever & Marisa E. Domino, 1997. "Within Group "Structural" Tests of Labor-Market Discrimination: A Study of Persons with Serious Disabilities," NBER Working Papers 5931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Jacobson, Louis S & LaLonde, Robert J & Sullivan, Daniel G, 1993. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 685-709, September.
  11. Bruce C. Fallick, 1995. "A review of the recent empirical literature on displaced workers," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 95-14, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  12. Kanika Kapur, 1998. "The Impact of health on job mobility: A measure of job lock," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(2), pages 282-298, January.
  13. repec:mpr:mprres:997 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1991. "Are Workers Permanently Scarred by Job Displacements?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 319-24, March.
  15. Steven G. Allen & Robert L. Clark & Ann A. McDermed, 1993. "Pensions, Bonding, and Lifetime Jobs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(3), pages 463-481.
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