IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wiw/wus005/3994.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Gender and Migration Background in Intergenerational Educational Mobility

Author

Listed:
  • Schneebaum, Alyssa

    ()

  • Rumplmaier, Bernhard

    ()

  • Altzinger, Wilfried

    ()

Abstract

We employ 2011 European Union Survey on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) data for Austria to perform Markovian mobility matrix analysis and uni- and multivariate econometric analysis to study intergenerational educational mobility by gender and migration background. We find that the educational attainment of girls and migrants relative to their parents is less mobile than for boys and natives. Further, the immobility of educational attainment is enhanced by the intersection of these identities: migrant girls are the least educationally mobile group and are especially likely to follow their mothers 19 educational footsteps, while native boys are the most mobile, especially compared to their mothers. (authors' abstract)

Suggested Citation

  • Schneebaum, Alyssa & Rumplmaier, Bernhard & Altzinger, Wilfried, 2013. "Gender and Migration Background in Intergenerational Educational Mobility," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 3994, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wus005:3994
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://epub.wu.ac.at/3994/
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://epub.wu.ac.at/4735/
    File Function: revised version
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gabriela Schütz & Heinrich W. Ursprung & Ludger Wößmann, 2008. "Education Policy and Equality of Opportunity," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 279-308, May.
    2. Hertz Tom & Jayasundera Tamara & Piraino Patrizio & Selcuk Sibel & Smith Nicole & Verashchagina Alina, 2008. "The Inheritance of Educational Inequality: International Comparisons and Fifty-Year Trends," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-48, January.
    3. Gary Solon, 2002. "Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 59-66, Summer.
    4. Shorrocks, A F, 1978. "The Measurement of Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 1013-1024, September.
    5. Nicole Schneeweis, 2011. "Educational institutions and the integration of migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1281-1308, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Volker Ziemann, 2015. "Towards more gender equality in Austria," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1273, OECD Publishing.
    2. Jesus Crespo Cuaresma & Peter Huber & Doris A. Oberdabernig & Anna Raggl, 2015. "Migration in an ageing Europe: What are the challenges?," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 79, WWWforEurope.
    3. repec:clr:wugarc:y:2016v:42i:04p:617 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:clr:wugarc:y:2016v:42i:4p:617 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Leone, Tharcisio, 2017. "The gender gap in intergenerational mobility: Evidence of educational persistence in Brazil," Discussion Papers 2017/27, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    6. Gunther Tichy, 2015. "Protecting social inclusion and mobility in a low growth scenario," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 100, WWWforEurope.
    7. Karl Aiginger, 2016. "New Dynamics for Europe: Reaping the Benefits of Socio-ecological Transition. Synthesis Report Part I," WWWforEurope Deliverables series 11, WWWforEurope.
    8. Wilfried Altzinger & Jesus Crespo Cuaresma & Petra Sauer & Alyssa Schneebaum & Bernhard Rumplmaier, 2015. "Education and Social Mobility in Europe: Levelling the Playing Field for Europe’s Children and Fuelling its Economy," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 80, WWWforEurope.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wiw:wus005:3994. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (WU Library). General contact details of provider: http://epub.wu.ac.at .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.