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Offshoring and the Elasticity of Labour Demand


  • Neil Foster-McGregor

    () (The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw)

  • Johannes Pöschl
  • Robert Stehrer

    () (The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw)


This paper examines the impact of offshoring on labour elasticities for a sample of 40 countries over the period 1995-2009 using the recently compiled World Input-Output Database (WIOD). Including measures of narrow and broad offshoring, as well as indicators of manufacturing and services offshoring, in conditional and unconditional labour demand equations we find that offshoring has an overall neutral or slightly positive effect on employment. This result hides differences across industry types and across employment types however, with additional results indicating a negative effect of services offshoring in many industry types. Positive effects of other offshoring measures are found in high-tech manufacturing and for high-educated employment in particular.

Suggested Citation

  • Neil Foster-McGregor & Johannes Pöschl & Robert Stehrer, 2012. "Offshoring and the Elasticity of Labour Demand," wiiw Working Papers 90, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  • Handle: RePEc:wii:wpaper:90

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Hagemejer & Joanna Tyrowicz, 2017. "Upstreamness of employment and global financial crisis in Poland: the role of position in the global value chains," GRAPE Working Papers 15, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    2. Neil Foster-McGregor & Robert Stehrer & Marcel Timmer, 2013. "International Fragmentation of Production, Trade and Growth: Impacts and Prospects for EU Member States," wiiw Research Reports 387, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    3. Bramucci, Alessandro, 2016. "Offshoring, employment and wages," IPE Working Papers 71/2016, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    4. Alessandro Bramucci, 2015. "Offshoring, Employment and Wages," Working Papers 1506, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Department of Economics, Society & Politics - Scientific Committee - L. Stefanini & G. Travaglini, revised 2015.
    5. Neil Foster-McGregor & Mario Holzner & Michael Landesmann & Johannes Pöschl & Robert Stehrer & Roman Stöllinger, 2013. "A ‘Manufacturing Imperative’ in the EU – Europe's Position in Global Manufacturing and the Role of Industrial Policy," wiiw Research Reports 391, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.

    More about this item


    labour demand elasticities; offshoring;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand


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