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Corruption and Anticorruption in the Czech Republic

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  • Lubomir Lizal
  • Evzen Kocenda

Abstract

It is widely acknowledged that corruption has negative impact on economy and society. Transition process in the Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) uncovered dormant possibilities for corruption that consequently required appropriate steps to be taken against. We attempted to document the state of corruption in the Czech Republic and the measures introduced to fight it. We covered sectors of society and economy according to their importance in the prevention of a corruption and a consequential hazard to the society. We also described the governmental concept of anti-corruption measures and outlined achievements and failures of such a program. The overall impression favors persistent presence of corruption within the society and economy in the Czech Republic. The state of corruption in the country, measured by the Corruption Perception Index, presents a serious problem since the index does not improve as transition process advances. Numerous comparative studies, however, suggest that corruption is more prominent feature in a number of other transition countries. We believe that the institutional framework to prevent and fight corruption appears to be improving.

Suggested Citation

  • Lubomir Lizal & Evzen Kocenda, 2000. "Corruption and Anticorruption in the Czech Republic," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 345, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2000-345
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39729/3/wp345.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Weill, Laurent, 2011. "How corruption affects bank lending in Russia," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 230-243, June.
    2. Jan Svejnar & Evzen Kocenda, 2002. "The Effects of Ownership Forms and Concentration on Firm Performance after Large-Scale Privatization," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 471, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Jan Hanousek & Evžen Kočenda & Jan Svejnar, 2007. "Origin and concentration," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15(1), pages 1-31, March.
    4. Goel, Rajeev K. & Korhonen, Iikka, 2011. "Exports and cross-national corruption: A disaggregated examination," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 109-124, March.
    5. Jan Hanousek & Evzen Kocenda & Jan Svejnar, 2004. "Ownership, Control and Corporate Performance after Large-Scale Privatization," Microeconomics 0406002, EconWPA.
    6. Evžen Kočenda & Jan Hanousek, 2012. "State ownership and control in the Czech Republic," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 45(3), pages 157-191, August.
    7. Chousa, Juan Pineiro & Khan, Haider A. & Melikyan, Davit & Tamazian, Artur, 2005. "Assessing institutional efficiency, growth and integration," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 69-84, April.
    8. Laurent Weill, 2011. "Does corruption hamper bank lending? Macro and micro evidence," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 25-42, August.
    9. Cristian Dragos & Daniela Beju & Simona Dragos, 2009. "Public and Financial Institutions in Transition Economies: An Overview and Recent Evidences from Central and Eastern Europe," Managing Global Transitions, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 7(2), pages 147-170.
    10. Petra Koudelkova & Wadim Strielkowski & Denisa Hejlova, 2015. "Corruption and System Change in the Czech Republic: Firm-level Evidence," DANUBE: Law and Economics Review, European Association Comenius - EACO, issue 1, pages 25-46, March.
    11. Nemecek, Libor & Hanousek, Jan, 2002. "Market structure, liquidity, and information based trading at the Prague Stock Exchange," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 293-305, September.
    12. Jan Hanousek & Filip Palda, 2002. "Why People Evade Taxes in the Czech and Slovak Republics: A Tale of Twins," Public Economics 0205003, EconWPA.
    13. Ahmad Fawad, 2013. "Corruption and Information Sharing as Determinants of Non-Performing Loans," Business Systems Research, De Gruyter Open, vol. 4(1), pages 87-98, March.
    14. Pál Csapodi & István Takács & Katalin György-Takács, 2011. "Corruption as a Deviant Social Attitude," Public Finance Quarterly, State Audit Office of Hungary, vol. 56(1), pages 27-43.
    15. Goel, Rajeev K. & Korhonen, Iikka, 2011. "Exports and cross-national corruption: A disaggregated examination," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 109-124, March.
    16. repec:rom:rampas:v:2016:y:2016:i:26:p:78-96 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Ladislava Grochova & Tomas Otahal, 2011. "Corruption in the Czech and the Slovak Republics: Did the EU Pressure Improve Legal Enforcement?," MENDELU Working Papers in Business and Economics 2011-04, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; intitutions; transition; hidden economy; administration;

    JEL classification:

    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • P27 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Performance and Prospects
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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