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Why People Evade Taxes in the Czech and Slovak Republics: A Tale of Twins

  • Jan Hanousek

    (Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education-Economics Institute)

  • Filip Palda

    (École nationale d'administration publique)

The present paper uses a survey of 1062 Czechs and 524 Slovaks to ask why people evade taxes. We maintain that the Czech and Slovak Republics are “twins” separated at birth and that divergences between these countries since their separation in 1992 can explain divergences in their rates of tax evasion. High Slovak tax rates and lower Czech tax rates seem to explain little of the difference in evasion between the two countries. Rising Czech incomes seems the main reason that Czech Republic evades more taxes. We also look at detailed demographic and psychological reasons for tax evasion. We find that morality is a strong deterrent to evasion.

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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Public Economics with number 0205003.

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Date of creation: 09 May 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwppe:0205003
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  1. Andreoni, J. & Erard, B. & Feinstein, J., 1996. "Tax Compliance," Working papers 9610r, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  2. Allingham, Michael G. & Sandmo, Agnar, 1972. "Income tax evasion: a theoretical analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3-4), pages 323-338, November.
  3. Joel Slemrod & Shlomo Yitzhaki, 2000. "Tax Avoidance, Evasion, and Administration," NBER Working Papers 7473, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Lubomir Lizal & Evzen Kocenda, 2000. "Corruption and Anticorruption in the Czech Republic," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 345, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  5. Scotchmer, Suzanne, 1989. "Who profits from taxpayer confusion?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 49-55.
  6. Peter Sørensen, 1994. "From the global income tax to the dual income tax: Recent tax reforms in the Nordic countries," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 57-79, February.
  7. Baldry, Jonathan C, 1987. "Income Tax Evasion and the Tax Schedule: Some Experimental Results," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 42(3), pages 357-83.
  8. Clotfelter, Charles T, 1983. "Tax Evasion and Tax Rates: An Analysis of Individual Returns," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(3), pages 363-73, August.
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