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Does the Slovenian Public Work Program Increase Participants' Chances to Find a Job?


  • Vodopivec, Milan


This paper analyzes the effects of Slovenian public works on employability of the participants during 1992-1996. It shows that immediately upon the completion, the program helps the participants to find a job, but in the longer run, the positive effect is dissipated and the impact becomes negative. Some of the exits to employment upon the completion of the program can be attributed to converting public jobs positions to permanent ones, and the longer term negative impact on finding a job could be related to stigmatization of the participants. The study also shows that public works reduce I the exit rate to inactivity.
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Suggested Citation

  • Vodopivec, Milan, 1999. "Does the Slovenian Public Work Program Increase Participants' Chances to Find a Job?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 113-130, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:27:y:1999:i:1:p:113-130

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Patrick Puhani & Viktor Steiner, 1997. "The Effectiveness and Efficiency of Active Labour Market Policies in Poland," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 209-231, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lizal, Lubomir & Kocenda, Evzen, 2001. "State of corruption in transition: case of the Czech Republic," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 138-160, June.
    2. Milan Vodopivec, 2004. "Income Support for the Unemployed : Issues and Options," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14922.
    3. Alan A. Bevan & Saul Estrin, 2000. "The Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in Transition Economies," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 342, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Núria Rodríguez-Planas & Jacob Benus, 2007. "Evaluating Active Labor Markets in Romania," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 699.07, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    5. Nuria Rodriguez-Planas†, 2007. "What Works Best For Getting The Unemployed Back To Work: Employment Services Or Small-Business Assistance Programmes? Evidence From Romania," Working Papers 2007-32, FEDEA.
    6. Betcherman, Gordon & Olivas, Karina & Dar, Amit, 2004. "Impacts of active labor market programs : new evidence from evaluations with particular attention to developing and transition countries," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 29142, The World Bank.
    7. Vodopivec, Milan & Raju, Dhushyanth, 2002. "Income support systems for the unemployed : issues and options," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 25529, The World Bank.
    8. Camarero, Mariam & Carrion-i-Silvestre, Josep Lluis & Tamarit, Cecilio, 2005. "Unemployment dynamics and NAIRU estimates for accession countries: A univariate approach," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 584-603, September.
    9. Nuria Rodriguez-Planas† & Jacob Benus, 2007. "Evaluative Active Labor Market Programmes in Romania," Working Papers 2007-31, FEDEA.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy


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