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Employment services and active labor market programs in Eastern European and Central Asian countries

  • Kuddo, Arvo
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    The objective of this paper is to look at employment services and labor market policies in the transition countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and identify key benefits and constraints of active labor market programs, as well as the main characteristics and features of successful policy interventions. Various policy options are discussed on how to enhance public employment services but also private employment agencies which might be relevant to and suitable for the countries in the region given their macroeconomic and labor market situation. Overall, this report recommends that greater resources will be needed for active labor market programs (ALMPs) in the future. However, the emphasis should be put on improving the design and effectiveness of ALMPs, rather than on increasing spending levels only.

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    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2009/10/26/000333038_20091026025909/Rendered/PDF/512530NWP0SP0D10Box342020B01PUBLIC1.pdf
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    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Social Protection Discussion Papers with number 51253.

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    Date of creation: 01 Oct 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:51253
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    1. Fretwell, David H. & Benus, Jacob & O'Leary, Christopher J., 1999. "Evaluating the impact of active labor programs : results of cross country studies in Europe and Central Asia," Social Protection Discussion Papers 20131, The World Bank.
    2. Almeida, Rita & Galasso, Emanuela, 2007. "Jump-starting self-employment ? Evidence among welfare participants in Argentina," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4270, The World Bank.
    3. Ninno, Carlo del & Subbarao, Kalanidhi & Milazzo, Annamaria, 2009. "How to make public works work : a review of the experiences," Social Protection Discussion Papers 48567, The World Bank.
    4. Vera Brusentsev & Wayne Vroman, 2008. "Unemployment And Unemployment Protection In Transition Economies," Working Papers 08-15, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    5. Thomas A. Mroz & Timothy H. Savage, 2006. "The Long-Term Effects of Youth Unemployment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
    6. O'Higgins, Niall, 2001. "Youth unemployment and employment policy: a global perspective," MPRA Paper 23698, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. World Bank, 2002. "Labor Market in Postwar Bosnia and Herzegovina : How to Encourage Businesses to Create Jobs and Increase Worker Mobility," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15333, The World Bank.
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