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Job Rights in Russian Firms: Endangered or Extinct Institution?

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  • Susan J. Linz

Abstract

Did the Soviet institution of job rights, guaranteed employment despite individual or firm performance, survive the initial stages of transition in the Russian economy? This paper employs survey data collected in 1992 and 1995 to evaluate the extent to which job rights continued to influence the behavior of firms and households three years after Russia inititated its reform program. Using a variety of measures, the results indicate that, while job rights might have been an endangered institution in 1995, the institution does not appear to have been rendered extinct.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan J. Linz, 1998. "Job Rights in Russian Firms: Endangered or Extinct Institution?," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 128, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:1998-128
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39518/3/wp128.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Polterovich, Victor, 2000. "Employment- wage decisions in the insider-owned firm," BOFIT Discussion Papers 1/2000, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    2. Koumakhov, R. & Najman, B., 1999. "Labor Hoarding in Russia: Where Does it Come From ?," DELTA Working Papers 1999-23, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
    3. Lizal, Lubomir & Kocenda, Evzen, 2001. "State of corruption in transition: case of the Czech Republic," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 138-160, June.
    4. Alan A. Bevan & Saul Estrin, 2000. "The Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in Transition Economies," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 342, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    5. Linz, Susan J., 2004. "Motivating Russian workers: analysis of age and gender differences," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 261-289, July.
    6. Randall K. Filer & Jan Hanousek, 2002. "Data Watch: Research Data from Transition Economies," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 225-240, Winter.
    7. Susan Linz, 2000. "Restructuring with What Success? A Case Study of Russian Firms," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 324, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    8. Linz, Susan J. & Semykina, Anastasia, 2008. "How do workers fare during transition? Perceptions of job insecurity among Russian workers, 1995-2004," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 442-458, June.
    9. Polterovich, Victor, 2000. "Civic Culture and Economic Transition in Russia," MPRA Paper 20068, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job rights; employment; Russian transition economy;

    JEL classification:

    • P3 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions
    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets

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