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Labor Hoarding In Russia: Where Does It Come From?

Author

Listed:
  • Rouslan Koumakhov

    (FORUM - Fondements des organisations et des régulations de l'univers marchand - UPN - Université Paris Nanterre - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Boris Najman

    () (ROSES - Réformes et Ouverture des Systèmes Economiques post-Socialistes - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, GRATICE - UPEC UP12 - Université Paris-Est Créteil Val-de-Marne - Paris 12)

Abstract

The paper focuses on the labor "hoarding" problem in Russian. We studied two forms of "hoarding": unpaid leaves and short-time work. Our research is based on the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS) database. The paper exploits individual panel data between 1994 and 1996. We show that unpaid leaves and short-time work do not represent a form of hidden unemployment. Both types of labor "hoarding" reflect the nature of employees' professional competencies. First, unpaid leaves concern primarily the employees with firm-specific knowledge, while short-time work affects strongly unskilled workers. Second, external mobility is mostly related to young people and unskilled blue-collar workers while employees with specific competencies do not change jobs so much. The paper insists on significant internal adjustments which are taking place through unpaid leaves and short-time work. This explains why there has been no massive unemployment in Russia until now. In conclusion, Russian labor market is characterized rather by internal flexibility than by labor "hoarding".

Suggested Citation

  • Rouslan Koumakhov & Boris Najman, 2000. "Labor Hoarding In Russia: Where Does It Come From?," Post-Print hal-00270953, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00270953
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00270953
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fay, Jon A & Medoff, James L, 1985. "Labor and Output over the Business Cycle: Some Direct Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 638-655, September.
    2. Richard Layard & Andrea Richter, 1995. "How much unemployment is needed for restructing: the Russian experience," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 3(1), pages 39-58, March.
    3. Gimpelson, Vladimir & Lippoldt, Douglas, 1999. "Labour Turnover in Russia: Evidence from the Administrative Reporting of Enterprises in Four Regions," Transition Economics Series 4, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    4. Susan J. Linz, 1998. "Job Rights in Russian Firms: Endangered or Extinct Institution?," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 128, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marek Gora & Grzegorz Kula & Magdalena Rokicka & Oleksandr Rohozynsky & Anna Ruzik, 2008. "Social Security, Labour Market and Restructuring: Current Situation and Expected Outcomes of Reforms," ESCIRRU Working Papers 5, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Ivan Samson & Patrick Ternaux, 2008. "Innovative Economic Behaviour in Russia: the Case of Labour Markets," Journal of Innovation Economics, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(1), pages 63-85.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    skills; labor market; internal adjustments; flexibility; Russia; skills.;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population

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