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Labour Turnover in Russia: Evidence from the Administrative Reporting of Enterprises in Four Regions

Author

Listed:
  • Gimpelson, Vladimir

    (Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Russian Academy of Science)

  • Lippoldt, Douglas

    (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD))

Abstract

Early in the 1990s, the introduction of economic reforms in Russia created expectations of a substantial reallocation of labour; "old" jobs in the state and former-state sector were to be shed and "new" jobs created in new private firms. Although the labour market experienced relatively heavy flows, they did not occur in the expected pattern. Most of the separations were quits rather than lay-offs and former-state enterprises continued to hire at relatively high rates. This paper takes a fresh look at the developments in labour turnover and the relationship between the components of labour turnover and various enterprise characteristics. National-level aggregate statistics are used to gain insights concerning the scale and structure of labour turnover in medium and large enterprises. A more detailed examination is then made of the components of labour turnover and their relationship to selected enterprise characteristics using microdata from administrative reporting in four Russian regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Gimpelson, Vladimir & Lippoldt, Douglas, 1999. "Labour Turnover in Russia: Evidence from the Administrative Reporting of Enterprises in Four Regions," Transition Economics Series 4, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihstep:4
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ihs.ac.at/publications/tec/te-4.pdf
    File Function: First version, 1999
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. G. Alfandari & M.E. Schaffer, 1996. ""Arrears" in the Russian Enterprise Sector," CERT Discussion Papers 9608, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    2. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, January.
    3. Philippe Aghion & Olivier J. Blanchard, 1994. "On the Speed of Transition in Central Europe," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1994, Volume 9, pages 283-330 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1998. "Measuring Gross Worker and Job Flows," NBER Chapters,in: Labor Statistics Measurement Issues, pages 77-122 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. A. Richter & M.E. Schaffer, 1996. "The Performance of De Novo Private Firms in Russian Manufacturing," CERT Discussion Papers 9610, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    6. Commander, Simon & Liberman, Leonid & Yemtsov, Ruslan, 1993. "Unemployment and labor market dynamics in Russia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1167, The World Bank.
    7. Vladimir Gimpelson & Douglas Lippoldt, 1999. "Private sector employment in Russia: Scale, composition and performance," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 505-533, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Koumakhov, R. & Najman, B., 1999. "Labor Hoarding in Russia: Where Does it Come From ?," DELTA Working Papers 1999-23, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
    2. Susan J. Linz, 2002. "Job Satisfaction Among Russian Workers," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 468, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Guido Friebel & Sergei Guriev, 2000. "Should I Stay or Can I Go? Worker Attachment in Russia," Working Papers w0008, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    4. Sergei Guriev & Barry W. Ickes, 2000. "Microeconomic Aspects of Economic Growth in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, 1950-2000," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 348, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour Turnovers; Hirings; Separations; Employment; Microdata; Russian Regions;

    JEL classification:

    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population

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