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Importing high food prices by exporting : rice prices in Lao PDR

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  • Durevall, Dick
  • van der Weide, Roy

Abstract

This paper shows how a developing country, Lao PDR, imports high glutinous rice prices by exporting its staple food to neighboring countries, Vietnam and Thailand. Lao PDR has extensive export controls on rice, generating a sizable difference between domestic and international prices. Controls are relaxed after good harvests, leading to a surge in exports early in the season and rapidly rising prices later in the year. There is thus a strong case for removal of trade restrictions since they give rise to price spikes, keep the long-term price of glutinous rice low, and thereby hinder increases in income from agriculture. Although this is a case study of Lao PDR, the findings may equally apply to other developing countries that export their staple food.

Suggested Citation

  • Durevall, Dick & van der Weide, Roy, 2014. "Importing high food prices by exporting : rice prices in Lao PDR," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7119, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7119
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Markets and Market Access; Food&Beverage Industry; Emerging Markets; Access to Markets; E-Business;

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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