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Microeconomic foundations of geographical variations in labour productivity

  • Don J. Webber


    (Department of Business Economics, Auckland University of Technology and Department of Economics, UWE, Bristol)

  • Michael Horswell

    (Faculty of the Built and Natural Environment, University of the West of England, UK)

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    This paper initially presents an exploratory spatial data analysis which indicates the presence of small-scale geographical variations in levels and standard deviations of labour productivity across England and Wales in 2005. We identify the presence of spatial autocorrelation for both measures. This finding motivates a subsequent review and extension of theories which suggest the possible presence of small-scale geographical patterns of labour productivity.

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    Paper provided by Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol in its series Working Papers with number 0913.

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    Length: 25 pages
    Date of creation: Aug 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:0913
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    1. Sylaja Srinivasan & Geoff Stewart, 2004. "The Quality of Life in England and Wales," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(1), pages 1-22, 02.
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    3. Ofer H. Azar, 2005. "Relative Thinking Theory," Microeconomics 0504002, EconWPA.
    4. Martin Boddy & John Hudson & Anthony Plumridge & Don Webber, 2005. "Regional Productivity Differentials: Explaining the Gap," Working Papers 0515, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    5. Manish Pandey & John Whalley, 2004. "Social Networks and Trade Liberalization," NBER Working Papers 10769, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    8. Azar, Ofer H., 2007. "The effect of relative thinking on firm strategy and market outcomes: A location differentiation model with endogenous transportation costs," MPRA Paper 4455, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Barr, Abigail, 2000. "Social Capital and Technical Information Flows in the Ghanaian Manufacturing Sector," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(3), pages 539-59, July.
    10. Eric J. Bartelsman & Mark Doms, 2000. "Understanding productivity: lessons from longitudinal microdata," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-19, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    11. Babutsidze, Zakaria & Cowan, Robin, 2008. "Habit Formation, Information Exchange and the Social Geography of Demand," MERIT Working Papers 047, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    12. Ottaviano, Gianmarco & Puga, Diego, 1997. "Agglomeration in the Global Economy: A Survey of the 'New Economic Geography'," CEPR Discussion Papers 1699, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Choi, E. Kwan & Harrigan, James, 2003. "Handbook of International Trade," Staff General Research Papers 11375, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    14. Piet Rietveld & Roger Vickerman, 2003. "Transport in regional science: The “death of distance” is premature," Papers in Regional Science, Springer, vol. 83(1), pages 229-248, October.
    15. John Haltiwanger, 1997. "Measuring and analyzing aggregate fluctuations: the importance of building from microeconomic evidence," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 55-78.
    16. Wagner, Alfred, 1891. "Marshall's Principles of Economics," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 5, pages 319-338.
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