IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uts/rpaper/345.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Automated Liquidity Provision

Author

Abstract

Traditional market makers are losing their importance as automated systems have largely assumed the role of liquidity provision in markets. We update the model of Glosten and Milgrom (1985) to analyze this new world: we add multiple securities and introduce an automated market maker who prices order flow for all securities contemporaneously. This automated participant transacts the majority of orders, sets prices that are more efficient, reduces spreads, and increases informed and decreases uninformed traders' transaction costs. The model's predictions match very well with recent empirical findings and are difficult to replicate with alternative models.

Suggested Citation

  • Austin Gerig & David Michayluk, 2014. "Automated Liquidity Provision," Research Paper Series 345, Quantitative Finance Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney.
  • Handle: RePEc:uts:rpaper:345
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.uts.edu.au/sites/default/files/rp345.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Biais, Bruno & Glosten, Larry & Spatt, Chester, 2005. "Market microstructure: A survey of microfoundations, empirical results, and policy implications," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 217-264, May.
    2. Garbade, Kenneth D & Silber, William L, 1979. "Structural Organization of Secondary Markets: Clearing Frequency, Dealer Activity and Liquidity Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 34(3), pages 577-593, June.
    3. Shmuel Baruch & Gideon Saar, 2009. "Asset Returns and the Listing Choice of Firms," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(6), pages 2239-2274, June.
    4. Biais, Bruno & Foucault, Thierry & Moinas, Sophie, 2015. "Equilibrium fast trading," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(2), pages 292-313.
    5. Carrion, Allen, 2013. "Very fast money: High-frequency trading on the NASDAQ," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 680-711.
    6. Oliver Hansch & Narayan Y. Naik & S. Viswanathan, 1999. "Preferencing, Internalization, Best Execution, and Dealer Profits," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(5), pages 1799-1828, October.
    7. Paolo Pasquariello & Clara Vega, 2015. "Strategic Cross-Trading in the U.S. Stock Market," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 19(1), pages 229-282.
    8. Thierry Foucault & Johan Hombert & Ioanid Roşu, 2016. "News Trading and Speed," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(1), pages 335-382, February.
    9. Dan Bernhardt & Bart Taub, 2008. "Cross‐Asset Speculation in Stock Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(5), pages 2385-2427, October.
    10. Terrence Hendershott & Charles M. Jones & Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "Does Algorithmic Trading Improve Liquidity?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(1), pages 1-33, February.
    11. Evan Gatev & William N. Goetzmann & K. Geert Rouwenhorst, 2006. "Pairs Trading: Performance of a Relative-Value Arbitrage Rule," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 19(3), pages 797-827.
    12. Jonathan Brogaard & Terrence Hendershott & Ryan Riordan, 2014. "High-Frequency Trading and Price Discovery," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(8), pages 2267-2306.
    13. Hasbrouck, Joel & Saar, Gideon, 2013. "Low-latency trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 646-679.
    14. Robert A. Jarrow & Philip Protter, 2012. "A Dysfunctional Role Of High Frequency Trading In Electronic Markets," International Journal of Theoretical and Applied Finance (IJTAF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 15(03), pages 1-15.
    15. Hendershott, Terrence & Riordan, Ryan, 2013. "Algorithmic Trading and the Market for Liquidity," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 48(4), pages 1001-1024, August.
    16. Hakansson, Nils H & Beja, Avraham & Kale, Jivendra, 1985. "On the Feasibility of Automated Market Making by a Programmed Specialist," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 40(1), pages 1-20, March.
    17. Austin Gerig, 2012. "High-Frequency Trading Synchronizes Prices in Financial Markets," Papers 1211.1919, arXiv.org.
    18. Fricke, Daniel & Gerig, Austin, 2014. "Liquidity Risk, Speculative Trade, and the Optimal Latency of Financial Markets," VfS Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100402, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. Alain P. Chaboud & Benjamin Chiquoine & Erik Hjalmarsson & Clara Vega, 2014. "Rise of the Machines: Algorithmic Trading in the Foreign Exchange Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(5), pages 2045-2084, October.
    20. Álvaro Cartea & José Penalva, 2012. "Where is the Value in High Frequency Trading?," Quarterly Journal of Finance (QJF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 2(03), pages 1-46.
    21. Menkveld, Albert J., 2013. "High frequency trading and the new market makers," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 712-740.
    22. Fama, Eugene F, 1970. "Efficient Capital Markets: A Review of Theory and Empirical Work," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 25(2), pages 383-417, May.
    23. Andrade, Sandro C. & Chang, Charles & Seasholes, Mark S., 2008. "Trading imbalances, predictable reversals, and cross-stock price pressure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 406-423, May.
    24. Jonathan Brogaard & Björn Hagströmer & Lars Nordén & Ryan Riordan, 2015. "Trading Fast and Slow: Colocation and Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 28(12), pages 3407-3443.
    25. Jiang Wang, 1993. "A Model of Intertemporal Asset Prices Under Asymmetric Information," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(2), pages 249-282.
    26. Caballe, Jordi & Krishnan, Murugappa, 1994. "Imperfect Competition in a Multi-security Market with Risk Neutrality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(3), pages 695-704, May.
    27. Glosten, Lawrence R. & Milgrom, Paul R., 1985. "Bid, ask and transaction prices in a specialist market with heterogeneously informed traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 71-100, March.
    28. Easley, David, et al, 1996. "Liquidity, Information, and Infrequently Traded Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(4), pages 1405-1436, September.
    29. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-1335, November.
    30. David Easley & Maureen O'Hara & P.S. Srinivas, 1998. "Option Volume and Stock Prices: Evidence on Where Informed Traders Trade," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(2), pages 431-465, April.
    31. Alex Frino & Vito Mollica & Robert I. Webb, 2014. "The Impact of Co‐Location of Securities Exchanges' and Traders' Computer Servers on Market Liquidity," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 34(1), pages 20-33, January.
    32. Katrina Ellis & Roni Michaely & Maureen O'Hara, 2002. "The Making of a Dealer Market: From Entry to Equilibrium in the Trading of Nasdaq Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(5), pages 2289-2316, October.
    33. Eric Budish & Peter Cramton & John Shim, 2015. "Editor's Choice The High-Frequency Trading Arms Race: Frequent Batch Auctions as a Market Design Response," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 130(4), pages 1547-1621.
    34. Garbade, Kenneth D & Silber, William L, 1978. "Technology, Communication and the Performance of Financial Markets: 1840-1975," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 33(3), pages 819-832, June.
    35. Alex Boulatov & Terrence Hendershott & Dmitry Livdan, 2013. "Informed Trading and Portfolio Returns," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 35-72.
    36. Pankaj K. Jain, 2005. "Financial Market Design and the Equity Premium: Electronic versus Floor Trading," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(6), pages 2955-2985, December.
    37. Albert S. Kyle, 1989. "Informed Speculation with Imperfect Competition," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(3), pages 317-355.
    38. Hendershott, Terrence & Moulton, Pamela C., 2011. "Automation, speed, and stock market quality: The NYSE's Hybrid," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 568-604, November.
    39. Chordia, Tarun & Sarkar, Asani & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 2011. "Liquidity Dynamics and Cross-Autocorrelations," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(3), pages 709-736, June.
    40. Robert Litzenberger & Jeff Castura & Richard Gorelick, 2012. "The Impacts of Automation and High Frequency Trading on Market Quality," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 59-98, October.
    41. Harold Demsetz, 1968. "The Cost of Transacting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(1), pages 33-53.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Edward W. Sun & Timm Kruse & Yi-Ting Chen, 2019. "Stylized algorithmic trading: satisfying the predictive near-term demand of liquidity," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 281(1), pages 315-347, October.
    2. Bellia, Mario & Pelizzon, Loriana & Subrahmanyam, Marti & Uno, Jun & Yuferova, Darya, 2017. "Coming early to the party," SAFE Working Paper Series 182, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
      • Mario Bellia & Loriana Pelizzon & Marti G. Subrahmanyam & Jun Uno & Darya Yuferova, 2020. "Coming early to the party," Working Papers 2020:11, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    3. Kin‐Yip Ho & Wai‐Man Liu & Jing Yu, 2018. "Public News Arrival and Cross‐Asset Correlation Breakdown," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 411-451, September.
    4. Hee Su Roh & Yinyu Ye, 2015. "Market Making with Model Uncertainty," Papers 1509.07155, arXiv.org, revised Nov 2015.
    5. Robert Litzenberger & Jeff Castura & Richard Gorelick, 2012. "The Impacts of Automation and High Frequency Trading on Market Quality," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 59-98, October.
    6. Austin Gerig, 2012. "High-Frequency Trading Synchronizes Prices in Financial Markets," Papers 1211.1919, arXiv.org.
    7. Moriyasu, Hiroshi & Wee, Marvin & Yu, Jing, 2018. "The role of algorithmic trading in stock liquidity and commonality in electronic limit order markets," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 103-128.
    8. Hasbrouck, Joel & Saar, Gideon, 2013. "Low-latency trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 646-679.
    9. Eun Jung Lee, 2015. "High Frequency Trading in the Korean Index Futures Market," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(1), pages 31-51, January.
    10. Daniel Fricke & Austin Gerig, 2018. "Too fast or too slow? Determining the optimal speed of financial markets," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 519-532, April.
    11. Kun Li, 2018. "Do high-frequency fleeting orders exacerbate market illiquidity?," Electronic Commerce Research, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 241-255, June.
    12. Zhang, Wei & Huang, Ke & Feng, Xu & Zhang, Yongjie, 2017. "Market maker competition and price efficiency: Evidence from China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 121-131.
    13. Benjamin Myers & Austin Gerig, 2013. "Simulating the Synchronizing Behavior of High-Frequency Trading in Multiple Markets," Papers 1311.4160, arXiv.org.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    algorithmic trading; automated trading; high-frequency trading; market making; specialist; statistical arbitrage;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G19 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Other

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uts:rpaper:345. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Duncan Ford). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/qfutsau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.