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Simulating the Synchronizing Behavior of High-Frequency Trading in Multiple Markets

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  • Benjamin Myers
  • Austin Gerig

Abstract

Nearly one-half of all trades in financial markets are executed by high-speed, autonomous computer programs -- a type of trading often called high-frequency trading (HFT). Although evidence suggests that HFT increases the efficiency of markets, it is unclear how or why it produces this outcome. Here we create a simple model to study the impact of HFT on investors who trade similar securities in different markets. We show that HFT can improve liquidity by allowing more transactions to take place without adversely affecting pricing or volatility. In the model, HFT synchronizes the prices of the securities, which allows buyers and sellers to find one another across markets and increases the likelihood of competitive orders being filled.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Myers & Austin Gerig, 2013. "Simulating the Synchronizing Behavior of High-Frequency Trading in Multiple Markets," Papers 1311.4160, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1311.4160
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Austin Gerig & David Michayluk, 2010. "Automated Liquidity Provision and the Demise of Traditional Market Making," Papers 1007.2352, arXiv.org.
    2. Gode, Dhananjay K & Sunder, Shyam, 1993. "Allocative Efficiency of Markets with Zero-Intelligence Traders: Market as a Partial Substitute for Individual Rationality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 119-137, February.
    3. Terrence Hendershott & Charles M. Jones & Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "Does Algorithmic Trading Improve Liquidity?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(1), pages 1-33, February.
    4. Hasbrouck, Joel & Saar, Gideon, 2013. "Low-latency trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 646-679.
    5. Austin Gerig, 2012. "High-Frequency Trading Synchronizes Prices in Financial Markets," Papers 1211.1919, arXiv.org.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fricke, Daniel & Gerig, Austin, 2014. "Liquidity Risk, Speculative Trade, and the Optimal Latency of Financial Markets," VfS Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100402, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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