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Ultra-fast activity and intraday market quality

Author

Listed:
  • Cartea, Álvaro
  • Payne, Richard
  • Penalva, José
  • Tapia, Mikel

Abstract

This paper studies the intraday relationship between ultra-fast machine-driven activity (UFA) and market quality in automated equity markets. We find that higher UFA is associated with lower intraday market quality (greater quoted and effective spreads and lower depth). This effect is economically significant, and robust to different specifications, endogeneity tests, and alternative measures of UFA. Our results hold after controlling for volatility, periods of unusually high UFA (a proxy for quote stuffing), and periods where UFA is primarily driven by fleeting orders inside the spread (a proxy for spoofing and competition between liquidity providers).

Suggested Citation

  • Cartea, Álvaro & Payne, Richard & Penalva, José & Tapia, Mikel, 2019. "Ultra-fast activity and intraday market quality," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 157-181.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:99:y:2019:i:c:p:157-181
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbankfin.2018.12.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hung, Pi-Hsia & Lien, Donald, 2019. "Trading aggressiveness, order execution quality, and stock price movements: Evidence from the Taiwan stock exchange," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 231-251.

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