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Equilibrium Fast Trading

  • Biais, Bruno
  • Foucault, Thierry
  • Moinas, Sophie

High-speed market connections and information processing improve the ability to seize trading opportunities, raising gains from trade. They also enable fast traders to process information before slow traders, generating adverse selection, and thus negative externalities. When investing in fast trading technologies, institutions do not internalize these externalities. Accordingly, they overinvest in equilibrium. Completely banning fast trading is dominated by offering two platforms: one accepting fast traders, the other banning them. Utilitarian welfare is maximized by having i) a single platform on which fast and slow traders coexist and ii) Pigovian taxes on investment in the fast trading technology

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Paper provided by Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse in its series IDEI Working Papers with number 769.

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Date of creation: Mar 2013
Date of revision: Sep 2014
Publication status: Published in Journal of Financial Economics, 2015.
Handle: RePEc:ide:wpaper:27008
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  1. Jayant Vivek Ganguli & Liyan Yang, 2009. "Complementarities, Multiplicity, and Supply Information," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(1), pages 90-115, 03.
  2. Glode, V. & Green, R.C. & Lowery, R., 2010. "Financial Expertise as an Arms Race," Discussion Paper 2010-87S, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
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  4. Sanford J Grossman & Joseph E Stiglitz, 1997. "On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1908, David K. Levine.
  5. Luca Colombo & Gianluca Femminis & Alessandro Pavan, 2012. "Information Acquisition and Welfare," Discussion Papers 1554, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  6. Glosten, Lawrence R. & Milgrom, Paul R., 1985. "Bid, ask and transaction prices in a specialist market with heterogeneously informed traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 71-100, March.
  7. Bagnoli, M. & Bergstrom, T., 1989. "Log-Concave Probability And Its Applications," Papers 89-23, Michigan - Center for Research on Economic & Social Theory.
  8. Vayanos, Dimitri, 1999. "Strategic Trading and Welfare in a Dynamic Market," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(2), pages 219-54, April.
  9. Carolina Manzano & Xavier Vives, 2010. "Public and Private Learning from Prices, Strategic Substitutability and Complementarity, and Equilibrium Multiplicity," CESifo Working Paper Series 3137, CESifo Group Munich.
  10. Xiaojuan Hu & Cheng-Zhong Qin, 2013. "Information acquisition and welfare effect in a model of competitive financial markets," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 54(1), pages 199-210, September.
  11. Darrell Duffie & Nicolae Garleanu & Lasse Heje Pedersen, 2004. "Over-the-Counter Markets," NBER Working Papers 10816, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Hendershott, Terrence & Riordan, Ryan, 2013. "Algorithmic Trading and the Market for Liquidity," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 48(04), pages 1001-1024, August.
  13. Grossman, Sanford J, 1976. "On the Efficiency of Competitive Stock Markets Where Trades Have Diverse Information," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 31(2), pages 573-85, May.
  14. Luis Gonzalo Llosa & Venky Venkateswaran, 2015. "Efficiency with Endogenous Information Choice," Working Papers 2015-44, Peruvian Economic Association.
  15. O'Hara, Maureen & Ye, Mao, 2011. "Is market fragmentation harming market quality?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 459-474, June.
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