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Equilibrium Fast Traders

Author

Listed:
  • Thierry Foucault

    (HEC, Paris)

  • Sophie Moinas

    (TSE (Toulouse University))

  • Bruno Biais

    (Université de Toulouse 1 Capitole)

Abstract

adverse selection costs for all, i.e., it generates negative externalities. Therefore equilibrium investment can exceed its welfare– maximizing counterpart.

Suggested Citation

  • Thierry Foucault & Sophie Moinas & Bruno Biais, 2014. "Equilibrium Fast Traders," 2014 Meeting Papers 1207, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:1207
    as

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    File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2014/paper_1207.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1991. " Measuring the Information Content of Stock Trades," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 179-207, March.
    2. Manzano, Carolina & Vives, Xavier, 2011. "Public and private learning from prices, strategic substitutability and complementarity, and equilibrium multiplicity," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 346-369.
    3. Glosten, Lawrence R. & Milgrom, Paul R., 1985. "Bid, ask and transaction prices in a specialist market with heterogeneously informed traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 71-100, March.
    4. Gautam Gowrisankaran & Joanna Stavins, 2004. "Network Externalities and Technology Adoption: Lessons from Electronic Payments," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 35(2), pages 260-276, Summer.
    5. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1971. "The Private and Social Value of Information and the Reward to Inventive Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(4), pages 561-574, September.
    6. O'Hara, Maureen & Ye, Mao, 2011. "Is market fragmentation harming market quality?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 459-474, June.
    7. Jayant Vivek Ganguli & Liyan Yang, 2009. "Complementarities, Multiplicity, and Supply Information," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(1), pages 90-115, March.
    8. Easley, David & O'Hara, Maureen, 1987. "Price, trade size, and information in securities markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 69-90, September.
    9. Terrence Hendershott & Charles M. Jones & Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "Does Algorithmic Trading Improve Liquidity?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(1), pages 1-33, February.
    10. Garvey, Ryan & Wu, Fei, 2010. "Speed, distance, and electronic trading: New evidence on why location matters," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 367-396, November.
    11. Alain P. Chaboud & Benjamin Chiquoine & Erik Hjalmarsson & Clara Vega, 2009. "Rise of the machines: algorithmic trading in the foreign exchange market," International Finance Discussion Papers 980, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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